Frankenstein's monster

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    Chosen Theses: Thesis 4: The Monster Dwells at the Gates of Difference It is known that monsters come in all shapes and sizes, from the stereotypical grotesque, menacing creatures to the seemingly innocent wolf in sheep’s clothing. Apart from appearances, monsters would also be created from cultural, political, racial, economic, sexual differences. With that said, all monsters dwell at the Gates of Difference, where differentiation is disapproved and abhorred. In the following essay, I will examine two iconic monsters, Medusa and Frankenstein’s Monster, their distinctions that separate or alienate them, and the significance of these differences in the becoming of said monsters. The first— Medusa, an African Goddess, revered as a symbol…

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    Frankenstein’s monster, in addition to his ugly figure, commits many objectively evil acts, and thereby possesses the most obvious, superficial monster qualities. But Shelley, through the monster’s narration, gradually reveals his perspective and how he was rejected by society — this narration forces us to sympathize with the monster and consider if his monstrous actions are justifiable because of how he was treated. Despite a concerted effort to explain his actions, the monster can never be…

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    through mad scientist Victor Frankenstein's pursuit to create unnatural life to his eventual bastardization of the very root of human righteousness. Throughout the novel, Frankenstein's utter obsession for scientific development evolves into an unquenchable thirst for foremost knowledge. It can later be learned within the narrative that this ravenous hunger became a fountainhead for his ensuing corruption and eventual demise. Through highlighting mankind's desire to find the undiscoverable,…

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    Greed In Frankenstein

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    titanic ego. After bringing a visually horrifying monster to life, Frankenstein simply runs away. Essentially acting as if his disastrous embarrassment never happened at all. In order to protect his reputation, Frankenstein never tells anybody of what was supposed to be a revolutionary new discovery. Of course, this was in fact a scientific breakthrough which would most definitely get him the recognition and praise he desired, but because of how hideous his creation turned out to be,…

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    The Desire for Power One constant in humankind is the desire to be stronger than other people. Every person wants an upper hand of some sort, whether it is through knowledge, strength, economy, or social rank. This desire for power has driven countless wars and other conflicts, and is present in everybody, whether they embrace or reject it. In Frankenstein, both Victor Frankenstein and his monstrous creation show that they want to be stronger, though in different ways. Frankenstein is entranced…

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    book's antagonist, Frankenstein's monster, in his opinion, suffered a great injustice and sought to plot revenge as part of his search for justice. In the beginning, Victor Frankenstein created the monster then abandoned him for his physical demeanor. Doing so, Victor unknowingly set forth a wave of destruction. Additionally, the monster states that he learned to be evil by all the rejection correspondingly with the hatred he received. In other words, the measures the monster took to inflict…

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    Victor Frankenstein describes his initial reaction towards the awakening of the creature he created. Immediately after Frankenstein animates his creature he is horrified and convinced that he created a monster. Frankenstein initially desired to animate a beautiful creature but was repulsed by his creation once it came to life. Instead of caring for his creation, Frankenstein abandons the creature, forcing it to fend for itself. Three authors offer different theories useful in analyzing the…

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    Lastly, human creations such as antibiotics and Frankenstein’s monster can have long term and sometimes permanent unintended consequences. When the monster escapes from his creator’s workspace in Frankenstein, he ends up creating horrific and permanent damage on the world by committing numerous murders. At the end of the novel, the monster himself even reflects on the evils that he has inflicted upon the world. He remorsefully states that he has “‘murdered the lovely and the helpless[,] . . .…

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    story is Prejudice and its effect on Frankenstein’s character. There’s many other themes that can be pointed out throughout the story such as Revenge, Lost Innocence, or even Isolation but Prejudice seems to stand out the most because that is essentially what transformed the warm hearted and caring creature into a cold hearted monster. The reader can see the monster’s true kind heart in various occasions. For instance, when he says, “during the night I often took his tools...and brought home…

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    Firstly, Victor is a man of science and the idea that science can reveal truth. The reason that Victor created the monster was an answer to what he felt was the power of science. When that creation is responsible for death and violence along with Frankenstein failing to take responsibility for it, Mary Shelley is criticizing the belief that science is perfect, something whose sole quality is the progress of society for the truth. When Frankenstein is horrified at what he creates, he leaves it,…

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