Elia Kazan

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    In 1971, Elia Kazan told Movie magazine regarding the process of adapting Tennessee Williams’ play A Streetcar Named Desire, that: “I took the script of the play, and I just made the play. And that’s all I did.” Discuss whether the adaptation was as simple as Kazan makes it seem through a careful analysis of both the play and film of A Streetcar Named Desire. Adapting a text to film is a difficult task for any screenwriter. There are many challenges that must be overcome, including limitations such as censorship and fidelity discourse. Despite this, some scholars see Elia Kazan’s 1951 adaptation of A Streetcar Named Desire by Tennessee Williams to ultimately reflect the author’s intention. Kazan notes that he "took the script of the play,…

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    Because Arthur Miller’s criticism of the informant relies on principal, not circumstance, his argument is more persuasive than Elia Kazan’s support of the informer. In On the Waterfront, Terry is asked to testify against Johnny Friendly on countless occasions, but he consistently declines. Once the mob kills his brother, Charley, he reacts violently. To avoid a fight, Father Barry says, “You want to hurt Johnny Friendly?... Do you really wanna finish him... for what he did to Charley...? Then…

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    The play A Streetcar Named Desire explores brutality vs. tenderness displayed through the personalities of Stanley Kowalski and Blanche DuBois. Marlon Brando's charismatic portrayal of Stanley Kowalski in Elia Kazan's film version of A Streetcar Named Desire undermines the validity of Blanche's struggle. The contrast between Vivien Leigh's Blanche and Brando's Stanley emphasizes the most negative aspects of Blanche's character while supporting and validating the most positive of Stanley's,…

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    Elia Kazan and quickly signed on to become the director of the play and the film adaptation hiring an almost unknown actor Marlon Brando in the role of Stanley Kowalski. The play became a smash hit, and even a Pulitzer prize-winner. This caused the critics and audience to demand more greatness from Williams just under 40 he was America 's most famous playwright he started to feel the weight of it all and started hitting the bottle. He dealt with alcoholism in Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, a play about…

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    While reading the play Streetcar Named Desire by Tennessee Williams, I fell in love with the story Williams created. I was completely sucked into the story that I fell in love with when I watched the movie directed by Elia Kazan and produced by Charles Feldman. The movie stuck to the script for the most part because Tennessee Williams was also the screenwriter for the movie. The movie starts off with music (directed by Alex North) that gets the audience into the feel of New Orleans in the…

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    Cat on a Hot Tin Roof Elia Kazan created a film adaptation in 1958 of Tennessee Williams’s original play titled Cat on a Hot Tin Roof. This film overall offers an expanded role for Big Daddy, and one scene in particular that clearly shows this extended role is the basement scene (interpolated just for the film), that proves to be very incongruent with Williams’s thoughts on the topics of homosexuality, communication, and narcissism seen throughout his play. Homosexuality, a topic evident in…

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    In 1954, the film “On the Waterfront” by Elia Kazan was released. “On the Waterfront” tells the story of a man bringing down a corrupt union boss along the docks of Hoboken, New Jersey. Kazan uses the film to paint a vivid picture of the waterfront as a space distinctly unique from other spaces in America. Through techniques of narration, Kazan uses the setting, characters and events of the film to create an allegory of morality. The waterfront, corruption, communist party, and events in Kazan’s…

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    Draft Terry’s heroism only comes from his instincts as a fighter. Discuss. Elia Kazan’s 1954 film, On the Waterfront explores how Terry Malloy’s heroism does not only come from his fighter instinct it also comes from the influential people in his life. Initially, the longshoremen exhibit a fundamental lack of courage to challenge the union however Terry successfully exposed this corruption displaying his heroism. Terry’s heroism also comes from influential people in his life such as Edie and…

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    Impact of Society in Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman examines outside influences on the individual. These influences include society as a whole, the family as a societal unit and beliefs which the individual thinks he should espouse. In order to understand Willy Loman and the struggles with which he is dealing, the society in which he exists must first be understood. He is relying upon a slightly different set of values and motivations than…

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    Introduction - This essay discuss The Running Man and The Castle in terms of ‘people who stand up for their values and beliefs’. The Running Man by Stephen King is a book that depicts Ben, the main character as the victim of a large, ruthless company. Forced to survive against the tv shows experienced soldiers and survive to earn money for his dying daughter's treatment. The castle (directed by Rob Stitch and released in 1997) has a similar story, the Kerrigan family is left in a position where…

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