Eliphaz

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    Elihu Character Analysis

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    attributed to God Almighty his very life and breath as well as his ability to understand (32:8; 33:4). His opening remarks were an extensive justification for why he was speaking at all (32:6-33:7). If we contend that Elihu’s speeches did add significantly to the narrative development and were not simply a repetitive string of others’ ideas, it will be important to establish what roles he filled. Adjudicator One reason for Elihu’s expressed frustration with the collapse of the disputation was his evidently bright mind. Like a lawyer, he summarized what he had heard, both from the defendant, Job, and from the ineffective prosecution, the friends. In the process, he also responded to key points from the preceding dialogues. There are echoes of Eliphaz (33:12-13; 15-18) and of Job (33:23-24; 34:14-15;22). Elihu synthesized, piecing together affirmations from all parties, and engaged in a certain amount of “creativity” as he restated the arguments and shaped his presentation of the evidence. In the course of his summary statements he seems to have put words in Job’s mouth. He attributed to Job a complete declaration of sinlessness (33:8-9), using the terms “pure,” “without sin,” “clean,” and “free from guilt.” It is not entirely clear that Job had been so definitive about himself. It was God who had said that Job was blameless, upright, and feared God (1:8). Job repeated the term “blameless” in response to the accusations of his friends (cf. 9:20-21) that he had sinned…

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    We are, however, kept in suspense for six chapters as a new voice entered – and it was not a timid voice. We will explore the nature of Elihu’s role at length but suffice it to say here that he certainly made himself heard, expressing his anger at Job as well as the friends for not doing justice to the difficult issues and adjudicating some of the fine points of the arguments. He also set the stage for the appearance and voice of the LORD. Then the LORD Answered Job (chs 38-41) Finally – the…

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    Light and his Ministers into Ministers of Righteousness”. The quote is a verse from the Epistles. When he wrote the letter, St. Paul was referring to leaders within the church that he believed were misleading their followers. Thus, In St. Paul’s view, those who preached false messages in the name of God may as well have been acting in the name of the devil. He deemed that the consequences of misleading Christians with false doctrines were the same as those of purposefully corrupting them. In the…

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    “For then you will delight in the Almighty, And lift up your face to God” (Job 22:26). Eliphaz declares this to Job during his third speech in “The Great Debate.” Even though Job has persistently claimed that he has not done any wrong and that he is not wicked, Eliphaz continues to reproach Job for his statements of innocence. Eliphaz finally specifies what sin he believes Job is guilty of, stating that Job has “taken pledges of (his) brothers without cause” and has “to the weary given no…

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    Job's Suffering

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    There comes a time in the life of every person where they hit rock bottom, it is in this moment that a person discovers how strong their faith really is. Job is the epitome of this statement. His faith was truly tested by suffering, but how he handled it is what earned him a place in history. During consequential tests and trials a person begins to need love and comfort, such as Job did. In the Book of Job, in the Bible, Job had three friends, Eliphaz, Bildad, and Zophar that traveled great…

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    Because none of them successfully scared Job into a confession with more oblique descriptions of “sinners in the hands of an angry God,” Eliphaz took it upon himself to accuse Job directly of grievous social sins (ch 22). His rhetorical technique was brilliant, commencing with two sets of questions. The first set anticipated negative answers (22:2-4) and in that context, Eliphaz returned yet again to the matter of fear. “Does He [God] rebuke you for your fear? Will He bring you into judgment?”…

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    When an individual comes face-to-face with extraordinary circumstances that are largely out of their control, the normal physiological reaction of fear. But fear of what? When assessing the motivations of the characters of both the biblical Book of Job and Night by Elie Wiesel, a definitive pattern appears. In Job, the friends Eliphaz, Bildad, and Zophar, are shown to have a frustratingly narrow and harsh interpretation of God and his sense of justice, much to Job’s detriment. Even though Job is…

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    his present circumstances, but he does not value his preferences more than his relationship with God. Job 4 In this chapter Job’s friend Eliphaz responds to Job’s lament of his birth. It appears that this friend of Job doubts his devotion to God. He states, “Remember: who that was innocent ever perished? Or where were the upright cut off? As I have seen, those who plow iniquity and sow trouble reap the same” (Job 4:7-8). Eliphaz’s speech seems to suggest that he believes that Job was not…

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    “with his lips” despite his wife’s objections. Thus, Job’s pain and suffering come across as entirely undeserved. Both Job’s innocence and God’s infliction of underserved punishment are emphasized. The blame cannot even be placed with Satan, as God admits that he was incited by Satan to destroy Job for no good reason. Ultimately Job’s suffering was God’s will, reaffirming the divine origin of suffering for not only the wicked, but also for the righteous. Before the resolution, the bulk of the…

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    The Comic Strip Peanuts

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    In the comic strip Peanuts, featuring “Good ol’ Charlie Brown by Schulz, it started off with Charlie Brown, the protagonist, complaining about the way their baseball game was turning out, and how they were losing. Within his complaint, he mentioned how he didn’t understand why he had to suffer by losing by so many points. This prompted his teammate to say “Man is born to trouble as the sparks fly upward,” which was a quote from the Book of Job, a book about a man named Job who was essentially…

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