Carlisle Indian Industrial School

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    Skating Pond Tragedy Essay

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    climbing a greased pole and attempting to catch a greased pig; all of this happening while townspeople looked on and watched in amusement. The interaction between the students and the Carlisle residents depicts an inherent contempt and resentment of the Native American children when they visited the town. That disdain contradicts the pride mentioned in the school’s accomplishments. Had the local residents truly taken the school’s goal to heart, the students would not…

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    The Survivors Speak

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    residential schools, most of the schools were hundred miles from their home and they suffered physical and sexual abuse there. Most of the Indigenous people addicted to drugs and alcohol in order to get rid of the horrible memories and this habit affected several generations. Nowadays, many Indigenous people suffer the discrimination and poor living conditions. With the help from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada, their living conditions get better and their voices can be heard.…

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    Jose Kusugak

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    In 2008, the Canadian government created the Indian residential schools truth and reconciliation commission which started its work to achieve an official order of reviewing the history of Canada’s Indian residential schools. The Canadian residential school system is, a system created for aboriginal people in Canada, to achieve the best chance for success by learning the English language and more importantly assimilating to Canadian culture therefore, passing it down to their children in hopes…

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    While it is evident that the Indian Residential school crisis was dealt with accordingly, it took the Canadian government 162 years to close the last Residential school and no apologies or retributions were made until 2007. Between those years, thousands of survivors struggled to fit back into society and had no support system to help them cope. Victims were tired of being ignored and years of legal campaigns to force the government and churches to recognize the injustices of the system led to a…

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    General life at the Kamloops Residential School was tough and grim. On the first day of school, students were given no time to learn the system or any of the English language; they were thrust into the daily routine, and European culture, very quickly. They were given identification numbers which was written on the few belongings they did have. One interviewee recalls being “denied . . . . any personal identity. “I was called, ‘Hey, 39. Where’s 39? Yes, 39, come over here. Sit over here, 39.’…

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    the history of the family and its culture. In Richard Wagamese’s novel Indian Horse, the importance of family is shown through Saul’s grandmother Naomi and the impact…

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    do this, residential schools were created off reserve land and parental access was restricted causing parents and their children to lose contact with one another . This allowed church employees, who ran the schools, the chance to take over and become the new parental figure for the impressionable minds of the young, terrified, and confused Indigenous children. Furthermore, as Carpenter states, the children were isolated from not only their family and homelands, but also from their friends and…

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    The Indian residential school was a government-implemented institution that engulfed all aspects of an Indigenous child’s life. As the long silence is being shattered and more survivors tell their stories, the full scope of the tragedy of residential school discrimination and abuse is gradually being revealed. In the documentary, Muffins for Granny, Nadia McLaren offers a raw perspective of the practices and repercussions of residential schools through interviews with seven First Nations elders.…

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    and culture”). In Canada, the establishment of residential schools began in the 1870s to “Christianize and civilize” Aboriginal children (Canada, Indigenous and Northern Affairs, 2014; Partridge, 2010, p. 46). There were over 130 residential schools present, and more than 150,000 Aboriginal children forced into these government-funded, church-run schools ("Residential Schools"). In his journal article,…

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    environment with people who they have never met and sent to an unfamiliar school where they may be minority and feel misunderstood. Many of the placements in Canada will often be homes operating from a Western perspective with little knowledge of Aboriginal beliefs, values or culture. At the very time a child needs to feel his caretakers are sensitive to his needs and attuned to him, he may feel very isolated and abandoned. In regards to 1 (V) I support the TRC’s call for action…

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