Candide

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    The Message behind Candide In the story Candide, written by Voltaire, there are several lessons that are meant to be learned. Voltaire’s satirical approach entices the reader to want to continue reading the story, find out what happens next, and really try to read between the lines for the deeper meaning. He makes a major point with his statement, “Cultivate your garden.” Those three powerful words combine together in response to the apathy or lack of concern created by philosophical optimism…

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    the novella Candide the author Voltaire chooses to end his book with the words, “we must cultivate our garden,” this ending line to the book had a pessimistic connotation. This line implies that in order to really progress in the world you need to focus on ways to fix yourself rather than focusing on ways to engage with others in order to find ways to fix the world. Two characters in Candide who portray the meaning of this line throughout the story are Candide and Pangloss. Both Candide and…

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    In Voltaire’s Candide and Wiesel’s Night there are two competing philosophies of optimism and pessimism. Night is a memoir of Wiesel’s time spent in holocaust camps during World War II. It is heartbreakingly real and unapologetic, quite the opposite of Voltaire’s Candide , which is complete satire debunking the philosophy of optimism regarding the human condition. In both texts, the characters were experiencing war, religious intolerance, starvation and sickness, and both main characters, Elie…

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    Under the guise of sarcasm and an erratic and fantastical plot, Voltaire’s Candide examines human nature and the human condition in the context of an 18th century France. This is done so not only through the derision of philosophical positions such as Optimism and Pessimism, but also of the religious intolerance of that day. It may seem at first that Voltaire views humanity in a dismal light and merely locates its deficiencies, but in fact he also reveals attributes of redemption in it, and thus…

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    philosophy of Enlightenment thinkers in Candide. He does this by using symbolism, characterization, philosophy, themes, and hyperbole to develop a satirical piece that contradicts, not only, Enlightenment philosophy, but Leibniz`s philosophy more specifically. Symbolism is used in this novel as an indirect way for Voltaire to reject Leibniz`s philosophy. One prominent symbol is the protagonist`s…

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    in the 1700’s women are viewed differently than men when one or a few mistakes are made. So what makes women appear flawed while men seem to be better beyond the faults they make in their lifetime during this time period? Within the satire novel “Candide or Optimism”, Voltaire makes the men seem more ideal. By doing this, he is making the women physically weak, full of vanity, insignificant, and unfaithful. First, Voltaire makes a female character physically weak while making not one, but two…

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    Utilizing virtually every character in a satirical sense throughout his 1759 novel Candide, Enlightenment author Voltaire squandered no time with his chance to convey any perspective he held when concerned with idle philosophers of his time and their theories of theodicy. Particularly, G.W. von Leibniz. Through the character Pangloss - a passionate philosopher, stubborn scholar, and faithful friend to the novel's protagonist - Voltaire makes sure to often allude towards the impracticality of…

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    My understanding of the book Candide by Voltaire was deepened through the IO presentation of the book. The discussion included the enlightenment period, different variety of philosophers and the social classes in France. The enlightenment period begins with the scientific revolution. During the revolution, many unusual philosophies made its debut, and people think that those philosophies are going guide people into a more preferable life. Apparently that’s not true, because in the novella, the…

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    The Role of Women in Voltaire 's Candide In Voltaire 's Candide, the author characterizes the women being relentlessly misused and raped, insensitive of any social or political class. Female characters such as Cunegonde, the old woman, and Paquette were set on that stage to due to the social standards in the eighteenth century. Cunegonde, the old woman, and Paquette weren 't major characters, but Voltaire stressed the gender roles and weakness of women in the society throughout the novel. A…

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    How Does the Characterization of Pangloss and Martin affect how Candide conveys Voltaire’s Message? In Candide, Voltaire illustrates the direct and indirect characterization of Pangloss and Martin to convey the deeper meaning of society through the life and increase maturity level of Candide. Voltaire portrays the companionship between Pangloss and Candide compared to Martin and Candide through the use of satire and rhetorical devices such as exaggeration, euphemism, and comparison and…

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