Anthropic Thermodynamic Principle

Great Essays
2.2. Theistic Evolution and the “Anthropic Thermodynamic” Principle

For Russell, the broadened notion of contingency based on creatio ex nihilo makes metaphysical room for theology to speak of the creative presence of God in the beginning of the fine-tuned universe and in the development of the self-organizing universe through the 2nd law of thermodynamics within the context of contemporary quantum cosmology. Those categories of contingency based on creatio ex nihilo and creatio continua also enable theology to speak of God’s objectively creative presence in the course of biological evolution and the emergence of consciousness. While God sustains regularities after creating their first instantiations (FINLONs) ex nihilo in both unmediated
…show more content…
In the emergence of life and consciousness, this whole process can be seen as ontologically contingent on God as an active Creator by virtue of the ontological openness of nature. That is, the fine-tuning of the universe belongs to global ontological contingency in that it is a given nature of this universe with the constants making it suitable for life. Only a small subset of imaginable universes could produce life. Yet the anthropic principle connotes the fundamental constants and laws of nature that operates through the interweaving of chance and law necessary for the emergence of life, higher complexities and consciousness. In the fine-tuned universe, God remains “objectively” (both in general and special providence) present in creatio continua in both usual and unusual occurrences in the course of evolution of living creatures in particular and in the history of the evolving universe in general. God can be seen as creative in the history of the universe through a direct/indirect yet “mediated” mode or through “created natural gaps in the causal regularities of nature.” They are “simply part of the way nature is constituted by God’s creative action ex …show more content…
Also, the combination of determinism and indeterminism in genetic mutations is consistent with the way quantum mechanics describes the natural world. “Biology presupposes physics even while building upon it.” For that reason, for Russell, QM-NIODA is foundational to a conceptualization of theistic evolution through chance and law. The collapse of the wave function may be seen as occurring by the co-operation of divine and natural causes. Here God can be seen as acting directly yet in a mediated mode at the microscopic levels of nature to bring forth the result of a particular measurement that is consistent with the probabilistic character of quantum mechanics. This means that God’s action at the quantum level creates indirect effects in its amplification at the macroscopic level where the general features of the world are sustained according to classical physics. This coheres with the way that a random mutation takes place in the interplay of chance and law and the way Russell construes it as a central part of theistic

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    Force Field Theory Summary

    • 1470 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Emergent Evolution and the Creation of God-Intended Independence of Creatures In that sense, Pannenberg understands the cosmos as a harmonious whole of the self-organizing creative systems based on the concepts of the irreversibility of time, contingency, law-like regularity, and fields of force. In this contingent self-organizing universe, the creation of independent creatures is the goal of the creative work of the Spirit as the all-embracing force…

    • 1470 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Science is in everything, including religion and lack thereof. In this paper I will show how scientism is tied in with the aspects of religious faith and atheism. First and foremost science is defined as the analytical and empirical basis for understanding reality, truth is either analytically understood or empirically verifiable. Also the main arguments that will be discussed deal with the finely tuned universe, the teleological argument, the theory of pragmatism and biological evolution. Scientism helps support atheism in the sense that with what I said earlier, science deals with analytical and synthetic statements.…

    • 1321 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    According to Craig, everything in the beginning has a cause, whereas the ultimate cause of all causes is God. It is only logical to assume that God was this ultimate designer of such a perfectly tuned universe. Similarly to Craig was Francis Collins who believed in theistic evolution or that God chose to bring about life on Earth through biological evolution. God is the source of all life and that life expresses the will of God. The idea of survival of the fittest is God’s way of creating life according to His plan.…

    • 1609 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    This argument also acknowledges a supreme being as the creator, but adds the character that is involved in an orderly universe. Philosophy of Religion states, “The teleological argument begins from the fact that the natural world appears to exhibit purposive order or design, and infers that its cause must therefore be an intelligent designer.” McCloskey insists on some of the same reasons for rejecting this argument as stated in the previous argument, but flat out rejects the belief that there is evidence of design and purpose. Disregarding God’s overwhelming design in nature, McCloskey suggests that there must be genuine indisputable examples of design or purpose. And as a result, McCloskey believes one could not legitimately argue that there was an all-powerful designer, and if there was a designer he would most likely be a malevolent imperfect planner because of all the ugliness and evil in the world. McCloskey’s argument seems to be completely focused on this evil world that he lives in.…

    • 1768 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Here the mutual dialogue is possible by virtue of the philosophical notion of contingency that bridges theology and natural science. The contingency of the universe is not merely a temporal finitude of the universe, but also includes the ontological contingency of its existence while historical contingency is not downplayed. Thus, God’s creation is not only in an unmediated form but also can be seen as a “mediated and direct mode” as one can interpret the transition from the Hawking domain into the Einstein domain as God’s creative presence ex nihilo. Likewise, in creatio ex vetere, the eschatological transformation of the universe, God’s redemptive presence is not only in an unmediated mode but also in a mediated and direct mode of divine action. For this reason, the notion of precondition of ex vetere in the present creation becomes important for Russell.…

    • 1169 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Aquinas describes everything to achieve their end “not fortuitously, but designedly”. This argument for design qua regularity was also spoken about by William Paley in his book ‘Natural Theology’. In particular, he considered the motion of the planets in the solar system, and concluded that they must have had a designer. The relationship between and the effect of gravity on the planets could not have come about without a designer; even minor changes in the laws of physics could completely change the way the universe works together. The arguments for design qua regularity are rational and easy to understand, as they contain premises and a conclusion.…

    • 1395 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Barth’s understanding of God’s being in act helps us strengthen the ontological basis of the Trinitarian atonement by reconstructing the notion of the triune God through the incarnation. As we have seen above, Barth conceives of God’s being in terms of act, not in terms of substance. Understanding God’s being in terms of substance often gives us complications to understand how the triune God works in eternity and in time without changing his substance. When it comes to the incarnation, this identity problem seems to become more obvious. How could divine God become human without changing his substance?…

    • 703 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    The cause of this in turn, is God himself. For example, our universe had to have a beginning at one point, so we can infer that the universe once had a cause. On the flip side, if we argue that God is causing everything as it goes, we see support for one of our main premises which is that “things exist” and God himself must be causing those things to be existing as we speak. Whichever angle one takes, the Cosmological Argument makes the case that “God” is the sole reason for everything that exists…

    • 1405 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Why Do God Exist

    • 1028 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Because God always existed in reality and understanding, created the universe and things in the universe, God is also the Intelligent Designer (will use Creator as a shorter term). If something exists, it has an intended purpose because it was created by God, who neither requires or needs a purpose to exist nor to have a purpose for things to exist. All things that exist or will exist in the universe were created by God for a puipose. Whether a specific or undefined purpose is irrelevant to human reasoning, the Creator has a purpose for all things and therefore, all things were created by God for a distinct purpose. Let us examine this argument to establish that: 1.)…

    • 1028 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Newton continues with logic of different densities and forces that diversify the laws of nature, and by this, a god devising a world and the universe. As the prominent philosopher Newton puts it, “Philosophy not only brings us immediately to…

    • 1081 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays