Force Field Theory Summary

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4. Analysis of Keller’s Assimilationist View of the Relationship between Theology and Natural Science Based on aforementioned discussions, I notice that Keller acknowledges that there is not only consistency but also autonomy to a certain degree between theology and science. To be specific, for Keller, while claiming for “the reconciliation of religion and science” , she sees that theology has its own right in presenting the seemingly impersonal infinity of the cosmos as the creation of the interpersonal God of infinite love. In this way, theology can complement natural science in its own right. Also, Keller engages with diverse Judeo-Christian materials ranging from Scriptural traditions to medieval Jewish mysticism, such as …show more content…
Force Field: The Creative Novelty in the Work of the Spirit as the Power of the Future According to force field theory, the contingency of natural occurrences is to be seen as the dynamic work of fields of force. Pannenberg devoted significant attention to the model of the time-space-energy field, which he believes provides a consequential analogical/metaphorical tool for the portrayal of the all-embracing creative Spirit in the world. Pannennberg sees the theory of “a single all-embracing field of force” as fit for his enquiry of the world as the creation of the all-embracing Spirit of God. For Pannenberg, the force field theory “helps to show the theologically based idea of a dynamic of the divine Spirit working creatively in all events.” 1.3. Emergent Evolution and the Creation of God-Intended Independence of Creatures In that sense, Pannenberg understands the cosmos as a harmonious whole of the self-organizing creative systems based on the concepts of the irreversibility of time, contingency, law-like regularity, and fields of force. In this contingent self-organizing universe, the creation of independent creatures is the goal of the creative work of the Spirit as the all-embracing force …show more content…
Pannenberg’s Perspective of Hypothetic Consonance between Theology and Science For Pannenberg, if theology studies God as the unifying unity of reality implicit in all finite creatures, then the findings of natural sciences are to be seen as relevant to the content of theological statements. The knowledge from natural sciences can contribute to the theological enterprise of reconstructing a provisional image of the totality of reality. However, while Pannenberg places theology on the interface with other sciences including natural sciences, he considers the need for mutuality between theology and other sciences. That is, the interaction between theology and other sciences is to be carried out in hypothetical consonance. Theological claims about God’s salvific history are to be in consistence with natural science when there are overlapping concerns; yet, if not, theology is to be given autonomy, and does not have be assimilated to the limited approximations presented by natural science. This is because theology engages with the self-revelation according to the OT and the NT, which include the narratives of one-time historical events. A number of them may not be explained by the current theories of natural science that are subject to be reformed in the flux of time. A prominent representative case is the resurrection and the new creation that the resurrection promises. For Pannenberg, if the resurrection of Jesus is historical, the possibility of the new

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