Student Involvement In The Classroom

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A study conducted by Boekaerts (2002) found, “Students’ motivational beliefs function as a frame that guides their thinking, feelings, and their action in a particular domain (Mensah and Atta, 2015 p. 21)”. If teachers have a better understanding of the emotional and academic support needed by their students during this transitional period, they can make adjustments to their teaching strategies, learning environment, structure, and student involvement, to best suit the needs of their students. For example, if a teacher has a more active class, more stimulated hands on activities may help the students become more involved in active learning. Additionally, if the class is slower or not catching on as quickly, the teacher can adjust the instruction …show more content…
In addition to these modifications, teachers should encourage and foster peer relationships within their classrooms to build a sense of community and belonging. In turn, teachers may find that their students feel more valued and respected, and are more academically motivated to engage in learning during this time.
Further studies revealed learning goals helped to influence academic motivation and classroom engagement. Mensah and Atta (2015) collected and evaluated data information from a series of sessions of one-on-one teacher interviews that focused on concepts in the classrooms. The researchers also grouped selected middle schoolers into different focus groups, where they were prompted by questions and discussions led by teachers regarding their goal pursuits and experiences in the classroom. Interviews and discussions were analyzed to identify commonalities and relationships among the teachers and students. More specifically, the study examined common motivators that encouraged students to accomplish and achieve their academic goals set in the
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Davis (2010) found student’s engagement plays an active role in learning and is an important component in academic achievement and success. “Understanding what children believe, how they come to value literacy, and the role of instructional design in shaping their experiences will help guide the ways in which we invite students toward a lifetime of literacy (p. 76).” Therefore, it is important as educators, to understand how to engage students in meaningful and active learning and motivate them by building self-efficacy and competence through instructional practices. Children find meaning to learning when they become active participants, have choices, and can collaborate with peers in regards to their thoughts. Research found that student-centered reading programs, were more effective in motivating students to actively participate in the lesson rather than a skills-based instructional approach. Students were separated into individualized small groups during the student-centered lesson and took part in self-directed reading activities based off their reading interests and levels. The teacher’s role during this instructional method was to guide the students to think, question, and make revisions to their reading material. Next, the teacher taught the class using a skills-based instructional approach, where the reading goals were

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