Special Education: Educating Students With Disabilities

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Special education refers to the practice of educating students with special needs due to their physical disabilities, or learning difficulties. These disabilities include autism, speech impairment, development delay, vision impairment, and orthopedic impairment among others. Such students have special requirements which are difficult to be achieved within the normal classroom environment. The advancement seen in the sector of special education cannot be discussed without mentioning the main law, Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), which was has been active in providing funds to states to help in educating children with disabilities (Javier, 2005). This paper explores the field of special education by interviewing the special …show more content…
To begin with, the fact that regular students are not protected by the law as their special needs counterparts is a big difference. The law requires public schools to provide or pay for the education of students if the local system is unable to provide free appropriate education. On the contrary, in private schools, the local school system must ensure that the state department of education helps students to receive appropriate education just like in public schools. The provisions of the main law in this field, IDEA, clearly outline specific goals and services that are meant to meet the individual needs of the students with special needs. On the other hand, to regular students, such provisions are not applicable to them. But, just like public schools, private schools are allowed to make use of the IDEA and the …show more content…
This is also the case with the private schools as they expected to do the same (Tucker, 2016). It is necessary for students who receive special education services to have an Individualized Education Programs (IEP). Similarly, the attorney stated that the federal law, IDEA, requires public schools to create an IEP for all special needs students. IEP assists in identifying the child’s learning needs, the services that the school offers them, and how to measure their progress. Given that IEP is an important document, various parties, including parents, are involved in establishing it. Since the IEP enables parents to highlight their children’s strengths and weaknesses, participating in creating it helps them come up with ways to assist their children succeed in school. Basically, IEP is supposed to address the unique learning issues of every child. It is mainly developed to identify the special education services that children with disabilities need (Dubos & Fromer,

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