Instructional Design

Improved Essays
Role of Research in Instructional Design
The role of an educator entails more than mere passion; it demands knowledge. Research responds to this demand. It discloses essential knowledge about learners, reveals social, psychosocial and neurological progressions that stimulate human behavior and influence society. Additionally, research is the illuminator that affords practitioners knowledge of the learning process, produces data for creation of learning models, and supplies information used to develop tools and strategies to advance the educational process. Likewise, research uncovers educational problems that exist in the educational realm, and suggests possible solution to the discrepancies. Educational research expands knowledge and boosts
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How can instructional designer plan a course of study if they have no knowledge of who their audience is, or the characteristics of their audience? Instructional design is not about the designer, but about the audience. Instructional design dictates that the designer uses research to inform construction of a program or a course. Learning outcome, instruction approaches, and assessment are centric elements in the instructional design process. Therefore, the designer must research how students learn best, best practices in the teaching-learning event, and guiding principles that undergird instructional design (Ferris State University, n.d.). The best instructions are those that are student centered … students become active participant in real-life learning events. Research will equip the designer with knowledge of teaching strategies that are able to promote problem-based and action learning, in which learners are given the opportunity to solve open-ended problems, work on real problems, and explore new ideas; thus, developing self-directed learning habits and efficient collaboration skills. The technological boom has changed the way instructional designers approach course design. The information age has stimulated instructional designers to build programs and courses that are grounded in neuroscience research. Thus, instructional designers are urged more these days to pay attention to cognitive …show more content…
The andragogical model was designed to assist practitioner in designing instructions that are suitable for adult learners. Trainers of adults will need to develop a sensibility of the characteristics of adult learners, because these are the principles that should underpin the training episode. An attempt to discover the audience’s prior knowledge is research in the form of assessment. It is necessary for trainers to have an idea of learners’ previous knowledge in order to plan appropriate content and learning activities. Adult learners use their prior knowledge and experiences as conceptual bridges that help them to comprehend new knowledge. Another aspect of the andragogical theory that promotes research is the principle that suggests that adult learners are self-directed and desire to take responsibility for their learning. Therefore, the facilitator needs to provide opportunities such as projects or real-life scenarios that require research and presentation. Moreover, adult learners appreciate relevance (in content and learning activities activities). They abhor unnecessary work or content. Research can generate rich and suitable for adult learners. Similarly, research can produce valuable ideas on approaches (chunking, concept maps, KWL charts, narrative) used for content delivery. According to Cross, 1981 (as cited by Dean, 2002), adult learners have a liking for utilizing sensory

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