Lord Byron's 'Fugitive Pieces'

942 Words 4 Pages
Harold Bloom, a Yale University professor, once said that “George Gordon, Lord Byron, is literature’s most notorious instance of a writer’s life becoming his work, indeed taking the place of it.” (Pesta, Bloom and Willis 1). Lord Byron was a famous poet that illustrated his emotions through his literature very effectively. Ironically, Byron enjoyed reading and writing, but hated poetry at an early age (Pesta, Bloom and Willis 9). However, Byron’s first piece of literature to be published, called “Fugitive Pieces,” was introduced in November, 1806 (Pesta, Bloom and Willis 21). Many factors contributed to the various writing styles and themes of Lord Byron’s literature; his troubled childhood as well as the way that he obsessed over sexual …show more content…
He refused to assist himself in the proper treatment to help his issue which led to the disease becoming more severe than it coulf have been. Additionally, he grew up with a schizophrenic mother, a father who left him early on, and a nurse who would hurt and molest him (A&E). These situations were the key reason why Byron was viewed as a depressing, yet full of love writer. The sadness and lack of proper guidance from adults led to the lack of happiness and joy in his life. The improper lust for women that he possessed from the relationships between him and his nurse when he was young. Moreover, Harold Bloom said that, “She (May Gray, Byron’s nurse) contributed to his future contempt for pious hypocrites and affected his relationships with women.” (Pesta, Bloom and Willis 9). He also showed defiance to the guardians and older influences of his childhood. He was sometimes violent with these adults and even caused harm to his aunt once when she tried to discipline him (Pesta, Bloom and Willis 8). He was also put under tremendous pressure at a young age because of the fact that he was put into Lordship before he was …show more content…
This was another basis for the types of poems that he wrote and sometimes even relating the theme of his poem to love. He was an attractive man to women as many fell for him almost instantly because of his physical features (Pesta, Bloom and Willis 31). This made his search for sexual partners much easier because of the willingness of potential mates to want him. He showed his affection toward many family members especially in his teenage years. The earliest account of Byron’s love would be at the age of 15 when he fell deep into love with his distant cousin, Mary Chaworth, and expressed his love for her through poetry (A&E). Regardless of Byron’s feelings towards her, nothing serious ever came of his confession of love for Chaworth. He eventually got married to a girl that he loved named Anne Milbanke, but shortly after marrying her, she and their daughter left him and he never saw them again as he left England forever (A&E). Coupled with the drinking that led to their short time together, the fact that he still lusted over other women. He even committed adultery with a girl named Augusta and felt terribly about cheating on his wife. As a result of the guilt he felt, he wrote a poem about adultery (Pesta, Bloom and Willis 37). When Byron left London, he stayed with a family of his close friends. His loving nature extended itself to the stepsister of his friend’s wife and

Related Documents