Congar's Trinitarian Theology

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A recent renaissance of the doctrine of Trinity in the latter half of the twentieth century has shown to be the impetus for many prominent theologians to apply this theology into all traditional loci of systematic theology. One such enrichment is the Third Article theology (because of the Holy Spirit's position in the creed), by which pneumatology assumes first place in terms of theological methodology. Standing on the shoulders of giants, such as Karl Barth or Paul Tillich, who did not have the opportunity to finish this project, recent works from well-known theologians have reassessed numerous theological topics from a distinctively pneumatological viewpoint, which have shed new light on contemporary issues. One of the key theological …show more content…
Taking the idea from Irenaeus of Lyons that the Son (or the Word) and the Spirit are 'two hands' of the Father, Congar emphasises that the mission of the Spirit and the mission of the Word are equally important and inseparable. In contrast with his previous understanding that the Holy Spirit continues and completes the mission of Jesus Christ, Congar claims in the latter part of his career that Christ fulfils his mission in the Spirit, and that both the Spirit and Christ are doing the work of God together. After quoting a text from Scripture found in 2 Corinthians 3.14-18, here is how Congar explains their cooperation in doing God's …show more content…
Paul speaks of the 'Spirit of the Lord', but he sees them as in the same sphere of existence and function of action. The glorified Lord and the Spirit do the same work. The unity of the glorified Christ and the Spirit is functional, that is to say, it is an operative unity. The work to be done in believers is common to both of them and the two 'hands' proceeding from the Father do conjointly whatever the Father, who is Love, wishes to do. When Christians speak of this, they do so both in terms of the inner Word or Wisdom and in terms of the Holy Spirit. Paul joins the two together under the name of the Lord, who became a 'life-giving Spirit' (1 Cor.

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