Stanford prison experiment

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    find answers to this question, Philip Zimbardo, a psychology professor, conducted an experiment with hopes to expand on Stanley Milgram’s discovery that the majority of good people will act outside of their moral compasses if the circumstance, specifically one with an authoritative figure, calls for it. Zimbardo’s infamous Stanford Prison Experiment went like this: Zimbardo and his team set out to hire, specifically, mentally stable and strong male college students for two weeks and gave them a role of either a prison guard or a prisoner. They were then put in a realistic prison environment and the master minds behind the operation observed how…

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    Marianne Szegedy-Maszak, author of "The Abu Ghraib Prison Scandal: Sources of Sadism," states that everyone is subjected to be a possible torturer (Szegedy-Maszak 76). Szegedy-Maszak asserts, the "unconscionable acts" committed by the Abu Ghraib were likely caused by "the anxiety and helplessness" of their horrific living conditions (Szegedy-Maszak 76). Philip G. Zimbardo, author of "The Stanford Prison Experiment," attempts to clarify the reasoning and motivation behind the sadistic acts in…

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    The Stanford Prison experiment took place in 1971. The entire point of the experiment was to see the psychological effects of being a prison inmate, and being a prison guard. The experiment was led by Philip Zimbardo, which at the time was a psychology professor. He didn’t just use anyone off the streets to take part in the experiment he used male college students. The roles were picked at random, after a psychological test was completed to make sure you did not have any issues prior to…

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    Connecting “The Stanford Prison Experiment” to Lord of the Flies “but look out the evil is in us all” (Goulding 208) stated William Golding in his novel Lord of the Flies. This quote implies that even the best us have the ability to do great evil. Dropping questions such as, how much of your “good conduct” is dependant on someone watching you? Are we more a product of our environment (Nurture) or DNA (Nature). Lord of the Flies and The Stanford Prison Experiment illustrate that when left…

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    intentionally mistreated by the guards on the first day, still underwent a lot of humiliation with simply the procedures of being imprisoned On the second day of the experiment, the prisoners rebelled and blocked the guards from entering their cells by pushing their beds against the cell door (The Stanford Prison Experiment: Documentary).…

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    The Stanford Prison Experiment, conducted in 1971 by researcher, Philip Zimbardo is one of the most eye-opening social studies done to this day. It’s purpose was to find out more about how the social principles of obedience and conformity can affect the behavior of a normal human being. Zimbardo wanted to discover how social customs and hierarchy affect the roles people play, in a prison setting (Lurgio, 2015, p.1866). Though their purpose seems praiseworthy, the experiment itself was not. It…

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    Stanford Prison Experiment

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    The Stanford Prison Experiment was a research developed by Philip zimbardo. The experimental prison was held at Stanford University in a basement where no sunlight Or contact to the outside world was available. This experiment went down in history as one of the most Best-known psychology experiments ever developed. The Psychologist selected 24 college students to undergo the experiment. 12 students were randomly chosen to be prisoners and the other 12 word guards. The 12 that were prisoners…

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    The Stanford Prison Experiment In 1971, a mock prison was built in the basement of the psychology building of Stanford University. About twenty-four male students were randomly picked to play the role of either a prisoner or a guard for two weeks. Prisoners were treated like every other criminal, being arrested at their own homes, without warning, and being taken away. When the prisoners arrived at the prison they were stripped naked, lost all their personal possessions, were removed from the…

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    The Stanford Prison Experiment was unlike any other experiment. It was supposed to be an experiment on how people would conform to the roles of guards and prisoners in a role-playing exercise. Over 70 students applied for the aid, but only 25 was selected and they would get paid 15 dollars a day for their participation in the experiment. They took the 25 college students from the university and turn half of them into guards and the other half into prisoners. The Abu Graib situation was way…

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    In my personal opinion, I do not view it as a “successful” experiment because some of Zimbardo’s questions could have been answered by simply investigating or studying certain cases or facilities that cause people’s personalities to be shaped or altered. Even though the study was meant to examine how “good people” act in an “evil place,” I found the study to be rather pointless. Although it was shocking to see how far the participants took their roles, I still think this could have been examined…

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