Stanford prison experiment

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    The Stanford Prison Experiment Does giving one person more power than another really change the way that they will react in a certain situation? Do certain circumstances cause a different reaction in different people? That was the question for the Stanford Prison Experiment performed by Phil Zimbardo in 1971. In an attempt to show what life was like to be in prison, the inmates and guards of Stanford County Jail, were placed in an almost inhumane setting. The tyranny of the men in charge, along…

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    The Stanford Experiment was conducted on August 16 of 1971 through August 20 of 1971. The experiment was led by psychologist Philip Zimbardo of Stanford University. The experiment was then funded due to a grant from the United States Office of Naval Research; which was of interest for the United States Navy conductors and members, as well as the United States Marine Corps. The military funded the experiment to help determine the cause of conflict occurring between military guards and prisoners.…

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    things such as getting a water instead of a pop and following cake recipes. Solomon E. Asch, who is a social psychologist at Rutgers University, ran an experiment called Opinions and Social Pressure. Philip G. Zimbardo who is a professor of psychology at Stanford University, ran a study titled The Stanford Prison Experiment. Both of these experiments prove that by human nature, people are scared to go against the norm because they fear the feeling of being judged, different, and the mere idea of…

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    Stanford Prison Experiment A psychological experiment testing human behavior when the variables of the situation are manipulated. In 1971, a psychologist, Philip Zimbardo conducted this experiment in the basement of the Stanford Psychology Department located at the college. When put in a situation where people do not question their morals, the evil in them will become more apparent. To find the psychological effects when taking on the roles as either a prisoner or prison guard. Many people…

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    The Stanford Prison Experiment which was conducted by Phillip Zimbardo was a very crucial experiment and changed the whole study of psychology that the world now knows today. This experiment continues to be one of the most notorious and well known psychology experiments that has ever been organized. It took place in the basement of Stanford college in 1971. Zimbardo took students at the school and told them to play the roles of prisoner and guards. This experiment was supposed to be a six week…

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    “The Stanford Prison Experiment” conducted in 1971 by Philip G. Zimbardo was looking for the answer to the question “What happens when you put good people in an evil place?”. This experiment studied the behavior of two groups consisting of young adults. The participants were given either the role of “Prison Guard” or“Prisoner” randomly. Essentially, this experiment’s goal is to find out if there is a correlation between a situation that puts people in a position of authority and power and their…

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    constructed The Stanford Prison Experiment to observe how prison guards would react to being given power over prisoners, the outcome was appalling. The experience became so realistic for the students volunteering that they went through temporary emotional trauma. The Stanford Prison Experiment has played a huge role in the psychology of human behavior for the purpose of understanding human behavior when they are given too much power, very specific people were chosen to partake in this…

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    How willing are humans to fill a role they are given? This is the question that the Stanford Prison Experiment conducted by Philp Zimbardo, professor of psychology, answers, even if it may not have been the original goal of the experiment. When people are pushed to the extremes, by internal or external factors, they are willing to do nearly anything. Zimbardo says that we “create, populate, and perpetuate” “prisons of the mind.” I agree with his statement, as many of the problems we have in a…

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    Imagine participating in an experiment that uses memory and learning. Once you arrive you see an instrument that gives electric shocks to a man. This man is on the other side of the wall from you. As you move up in voltages the man begins to experience more pain. This man is in so much pain that he is even screaming. The experimenter persuades and pressures you to continue going on. Would you continue the experiment or would you refuse to go on? Stanley Milgram a social psychologist at Yale…

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    The article tried to address that the prison guards and convict would tend to slip into predefined roles, behaving in way that they thought was required rather than using their own judgment and morals. It addresses what happened when all of the individuality and dignity was stripped away from a human, and their life was completely controlled. It addresses that the dehumanization and loosing of social and moral values can happen to guards immerse in such situation. The hypothesis is that “if man…

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