Stanford prison experiment

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    There are many experiments and studies that researchers do to find out how most individuals, groups, cultures, etc. think and act. Like what is considered to be moral or immoral and how society can be better as a whole. Some experiments are more well-known than others and will forever be discussed even if they took place decades ago. Along with the Tuskegee Syphilis experiment and the Milgram experiment the Stanford Prison Experiment displayed unethical conduct that would not take place in…

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    Stanford Experiment They lost their sanity, behavior changed without even realizing when it did, being in a prison can change people, well at least it did in Phillip Zimbardo 's Stanford Prison Experiment. The experiment was instructed by Zimbardo a psychologist at Stanford University, who wanted to learn how people would conform to the roles of being a prisoner and a guard to simulate prison life. Although these boys were actors, not real prisoners or guards their reaction was shocking because…

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    The highly unethical nature of this experiment is quite apparent, in the film and in the actual experiment itself. Starting with deception, it was evident since the start of the study when the participants were made unaware of their random assignment and led to believe that their roles were based on their nature. Demand characteristics were briefly seen when the experimenter told the guards that they expected them to show their authority and discipline the prisoners Furthermore, there is…

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    Zimbardo Assignment The Stanford Prison Experiment was a psychological study of human replication to captivity, in cognation to the authentic circumstances of prison life. It was conducted in August 1971 by Phillip Zimbardo, a psychologist at Stanford University. Subjects were desultorily assigned, by the flip of a coin, to play the role as prisoner or the role as a prison sentinel. Those assigned to play the role as the sentinel were given night sticks, a whistle, and mirrored sunglasses to…

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    Ethical Issues within the Stanford Prison Experiment The Stanford prison experiment was a controversial experiment in human behavior conducted at Stanford University in 1971. The experiment took twenty-four voluntary students and placed them in the role of either prison guard or prisoner, in a make shift prison that was constructed in the basement of the psychology department of Stanford University. The experiment was to last fourteen days but was terminated after six days due to the negative…

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    Manipulation and Control Experiments are used to get a better understanding of things. They help expand our knowledge on anything from diseases, mental illnesses, and why we as human beings act the way we do. In Stanley Milgram’s experiment “The Perils of Obedience” and Phillip Zimbardo’s “The Stanford Prison Experiment” we learned just how far some would go with the power they are given. Zimbardo’s and Milgram’s experiments showed how having the slightest bit of power can corrupt one’s morals.…

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    You just got accepted to your dream college and have enthusiastically spent all week packing all your articles, and now you are driving hours on end to your new residence, a college dorm in Stanford, California, on the Stanford University campus. You are so thrilled, but also nervous, to start a new adventure here in California. It’s your first day and you are eager to go to your classes and become that college student you’ve pictured for what seems like forever. While walking through the campus…

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    together and started the Stanford Prison Experiment. This experiment was held in Jordan Hall, which is Stanford University’s psychological building. The study was about observing the students’ psychological behavior as they were playing a role as a prisoner or a prison guard. Out of the 24, there were 12 prisoners and 12 guards (6 of which were alternatives), and they were all payed $15 everyday to be apart of all this for 7-14 days. Zimbardo himself took part in this experiment as a…

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    Zimbardo took twenty-four male students and half of them to act prisoner inmates and prison guards. He asked them to personate the prisoners and the guards as much as they can before the experiment started. Zimbardo states, “You can create in the prisoners’ feelings of boredom, a sense of fear to some degree, you can create a notion of arbitrariness that their life is totally controlled by…

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    Another real-world example of social constructionism that also shows itself in the Stanford Prison Experiment is the bystander effect. The bystander effect is a psychological theory that refers to the tendency of individuals to not offer help or assistance to a victim in the presence of others. Psychologist believe that the probability of a victim receiving assistance decreases as the number of bystanders or witnesses increase. One classic explanation of this theory came from two social…

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