The Stanford Prison Experiment

Superior Essays
The Stanford Prison Experiment In 1971, a mock prison was built in the basement of the psychology building of Stanford University. About twenty-four male students were randomly picked to play the role of either a prisoner or a guard for two weeks. Prisoners were treated like every other criminal, being arrested at their own homes, without warning, and being taken away. When the prisoners arrived at the prison they were stripped naked, lost all their personal possessions, were removed from the area in prison and then locked away. They were issued a uniform, and only referred to by their numbers. Sadly the experiment only did last up to six days, due to the guards and prisoners who quickly adapted to their roles, which involved cruelty and a …show more content…
As I read in the Diane Quinn’s article, “Mock Prison Riot 2000 A Technology Showcase” teams are participating in real life scenarios with new technology equipment. These people who participate happen to be technologists and inventors and many others around United States to join the prison riot. “The Mock Prison Riot offers one of the world’s largest exercises and technology showcases for corrections professionals in the realistic setting of a former penitentiary. Everyone has the opportunity to learn from one another. Officers are exposed to the latest in correctional technology, while vendors showcase their products and receive input from end users” (Quinn 180). During the mock riot, they are designated several technologies which are beneficial to the training. They must carry protection, for example, a stab and slash resistant body armor in case of a prisoner becomes dangerous or has some type of weapon that can be harmful. This does give a lot of experience to a real life scenario, everyone would be prepared. But in the Stanford Experiment, there are differences but also similarities to this showcase. The difference is the Pennsylvania Department of Corrections and Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and correction participating in this, which means real professionals involved in this mock prison. The similarities are that in both cases, there is …show more content…
Professor Zimbardo from Stanford did happen to notice during the experiment that most inappropriate behavior occurred at night. “To prevent abuses in the future, James argued, well-trained interrogators and military police must have responsibility for humane care” (Abeles 243). This happened to be argued and passed as a referendum. In order to prohibit this, is to provide more roles for psychologists. What happens is that people are taking advantage of others that are below them which leads to disturbing behavior that is not necessary. The torture of prisoners is way too much and there should be limits to it. In that way, it happens to be against the law to use any torture, cruelty or any inhumane

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