Stanford prison experiment

Decent Essays
Improved Essays
Superior Essays
Great Essays
Brilliant Essays
    Page 9 of 50 - About 500 Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The experiment that was conduct was for 24 college undergrad students, who were placed in a jail and treated like prisoners. Students were divided up equally into two groups of 12. Some were guards and others were prisoners. They wanted this to be an experiment to see how many people would react to evil. It all begin by transforming the classrooms in the basement of Stanford University into jail cells. This way the reaction the volunteers…

    • 798 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    guards are the reason of abusive behavior in prison. Like all good scientists, Zimbardo put his question into motion, turning the basement of the university into a prison. In present day, this experiment would have been much harder to get passed by Institutional Review Boards, or even not at all. While Zimbardo might have had good intentions, the Stanford Prison Experiment was a breach of research ethics. Before Zimbardo got the ball rolling for his experiment, he had a deductive research…

    • 903 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Decent Essays

    I am against human experimentation. Many human experiments are psychological, though some are physical, both usually causing damage to the body and/or state of mind. My first point being the Stanford Prisoner experiment that took place in 1973. Psychiatrist, Philip Zimbardo chose 24 out of 75 undergraduates and randomly assigned them roles as guards and prisoners in a mock prison on campus. They adapted to their roles within a manner of days,1/3 of the 'guards' began to show agressive and…

    • 276 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Superior Essays

    In 1971, an experiment took place in Stanford, California. It was named the Stanford Prison Experiment, lasting what was meant to be two weeks, but due to the brutality of the trial, lasted a mere 6 days. Its purpose was to conduct a study on humanity and show just how evil a human can get when given a position of power. To summarize the experiment, a random 18 men were chosen, all innocent, good people who’d never committed a crime. They were divided into two groups erratically: 9 being…

    • 1004 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The Stanford Prison Experiment was conducted by Phillip Zimbardo, a psychologist who wanted to test the conflict that volunteers would experience when put in situations where they were not in control. This experiment took men of the same ages and put them in a “prison” setting, giving them each the label of either guard or inmate. By grouping these men together in separate categories it demonstrated a form a social control. According to James Henslin, author of the book “Sociology: A Down- To-…

    • 1013 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Milgram’s experiments created great controversy. They showed how vulnerable humans were to the will bending power of authority. This idea especially stuck around the time the experiment took place, the early 1960’s. America was still somewhat fresh off of World War II, and Americans were shocked to see that they were just as capable of being pushed to do things that went against their morals as Germans were under Nazi authorities. Milgram was thorough in his studies by including multiple…

    • 1487 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Compliance portrays a true story that draws a eerie connection to the Stanley Milgram’s experiment and the Stanford Prison experiment. It involves seemingly normal people committing horrible acts under social influence. However, the real setting of the story in the film versus the laboratorial conditions of the experiments entail the debate over the extent of their connection. While the results of experiments certainly provide insights into the possible social psychological mechanisms that drive…

    • 911 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The Stanford Prison Experiment was a 1973 study by Philip Zimbardo. The study was to investigate how people conform to the roles of guards and prisoners in a role-playing experiment which simulated life in prison. The roles between the 21 male college students were randomly assigned the prisoner or guard role. The prisoners were stripped naked, covered in blindfolds, had all their possessions taken away and locked away in cells. They were given prisoner clothing and bedding, being only referred…

    • 296 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Stanford Prison Experiment What prevented "good guards" from objecting or countermanding the orders from tough or bad guards? The good guards were unable to object or countermand the bad guards because of the fear of what it would do to the guards’ authoritative role in the eyes of the prisoners. If they showed disunity as guards the prisoners could take advantage of the unstructured and create chaos within the walls of the prison. By objecting to the bad guards, they take the risk of the…

    • 1004 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The “Stanford Prison Experiment” and The Lord of the Flies by William Golding both show just how cruel human beings can be. They also show how humans can react when put in a difficult situation, how the participants’ behavior changes, and how the outcomes from both are similar. The prisoners from the experiment and the children from The Lord of the Flies did not know what was about to happen them. For instance, the prisoners were chosen at random. Just like any other criminal, the prisoners…

    • 810 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Page 1 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 50