Quebec

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    Quebec History Essay

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    Quebec is one of Canada’s largest and most populated territories and plays a very significant role in french history. Quebec makes up the territory that was founded by early french settlers in the 17th and 18th centuries. Quebec was also referred to as New France. Quebec's official language is French, its government is a constitutional monarchy. Quebec is located in eastern Canada and borders just north of the United States of America. Quebec's total area is 595,391 square miles. It makes up 15.4% of all of Canada. Its geography ranges from smooth prairies to rugged frozen mountains, to massive rivers and lakes. It has a massive amount of frozen and unfrozen water reserves that cover about 12 % of its total surface. Along with the water reserves it contains 3% of the world's fresh water. Quebec also has over a half of a million lakes and has over 4,500 rivers. One of these rivers known as the Saint Lawrence River has some of the world's largest inland atlantic ports. Quebec also has some of the world’s largest bays. Such as James Bay, the Hudson Bay, and the Ungava bay.…

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    Quebec Sovereignty Essay

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    We are writing this paper to give you some advise your government on the appropriate way to handle the issue of Quebec sovereignty in response of the Parti Quebecois victory in the 1976 Quebec provincial election. The Parti Quebecois believes that Quebec is entitled to its own sovereignty, and favours holding a referendum to raise the issue of Quebec sovereignty. If Quebec votes to separate from Canada, this could greatly damage Canadian national unity and have a detrimental impact on our…

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    demands are shaped and voiced” (Brainyquote, 2016). In Quebec, language had a great influence in bringing about the basic foundation of the identity of the province, as evident in the ways the use of French distinguished Quebecois from the rest of the country, and the shaping of culture within Quebec towards more of French origin. Quebec is the only province in Canada…

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    René Lévesque In Quebec

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    Lévesque, born in August 1922, was a journalist and a separatist and the premier of Québec from 1976-1985. From a young age, he was aware of poverty among French Canadians in the rural areas of Québec, which sparked his interest in politics and the economics of his province. He left law school before obtaining a degree and went into journalism and by 1956, he became one of Québec’s first television stars. In 1960, he joined Jean Lesage 's Liberal Cabinet and later established the Parti Québécois…

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    of the nation has been responses to varying elements of Québec Nationalism. From the Québec Act (1774) to the Official Languages Act (1969) and the Constitution Act (1982), there have been near endless attempts to either combat, or appease Sovereigntist elements in Québec. One of the major responses, Asymmetrical Federalism, works in Canada largely to give Québec greater political and legal space to exist as a nation within Canada, primarily as a result of historical trends of separatism or…

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    one’s province over one's nation. Quebec is a very good example of this. Quebec has always had a strong sense of nationalism since the founding of the state of Canada. Quebec has always been the odd one out among the provinces, being the largest majority french speaking province within Canada. The Quebec nationalist does not feel ties to France per se, but more of a tie to their own unique identity. In Canadian history “The case of Quebec illustrates how ethnicity, through powerful symbolic…

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    that Quebec needed to become an independent state in order to ensure the survival of the French language, uphold the integrity of Quebecois culture, and allow Quebec’s government to proficiently govern its own affairs. In the views of many, the fact that Quebec has managed to do these things in recent decades without sovereignty has diminished the need and legitimacy of calls for separation. In my opinion, these developments have indeed put to the lie the need for Quebec independence, for it is…

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    Quebec Act History

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    The Quebec Act is a law recently passed by the British Parliament in an effort to appease the French and incentivize them to ally with Britain, instead of with us increasingly “subversive” American colonists. Article I of the law states, “all the territories [between Ohio and the Mississippi River, and the Great Lakes and Hudson Bay] be, and they are hereby, during his Majesty's Pleasure, annexed to, and made Part and Parcel of, the Province of Quebec” (for present-day reference, this area…

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    Quebec has played a special role in French history of Canada. They spoke French in France, they feel that the way of living in France is still different from the North American mentality in Quebec. However, it doesn't mean that Quebec culture is exactly the different as the rest of Canada. I think it would be dangerous for them to do based on their history, traditionalism and their deep passion to do. Canada is at the reason why Quebec even existed. I think Quebec should not separate. Canada is…

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    The Quiet Revolution had a dramatic effect on the Roman Catholic Church in Quebec. Whereas, prior to 1965, the Catholic Church was a dominant cultural and political force Quebec, after 1965 the Catholic Church experienced a dramatic decline in its authority and its role in Quebec society. The people then abandoned the Catholic Church rapidly, and then transferred their allegiance from the Catholic Church to the Quebec state. This created a political vacuum within Quebec, due to the fact that, in…

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