Quebec Sovereignty Essay

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To the office of the Prime Minister,

We are writing this paper to give you some advise your government on the appropriate way to handle the issue of Quebec sovereignty in response of the Parti Quebecois victory in the 1976 Quebec provincial election. The Parti Quebecois believes that Quebec is entitled to its own sovereignty, and favours holding a referendum to raise the issue of Quebec sovereignty. If Quebec votes to separate from Canada, this could greatly damage Canadian national unity and have a detrimental impact on our nations economy and social well-being. Canada must remain intact and united as one nation because Canada would face huge economic losses, and it is not certain that Quebec would be stable enough to survive on their
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For Canada to hold on to its national unity, it is essential that all Canadians have equal access to English and French in any part of the country. Canadians have the inherent right to live anywhere in the country that they would like and should be able to communicate and receive services in any language of their choice. The issue of language rights is also solely a Quebec issue. The Government of Canada will also have to negotiate with Western Canada who has not been particularly supportive bilingualism. It is very important that Canada functions as an equally bilingual bicultural nation in all regions of the country, and not give special preference to French in Quebec because that would further isolate and divide Quebec’s relationship with Canada, and risk having even more ties cut. Canada must also be careful to not risk Western alienation by spending too much time catering to Quebec. We must have one Canada that agrees with similar goals and cultural …show more content…
If Canada were to allow Quebec special constitutional privileges such as allowing them there own constitutional veto, appointment of supreme court judges, and have them recognized as a distinct society, and allow them the possibility of secession, then other parts of Canada may start to want their own constitutional amendments that could ask for the same thing which could literally destroy national unity and tear our country apart. With the increased threat of Quebec nationalism and a newly elected separatist government, it would be best advised for the rest of Canada to slightly increase the power of the central government to enforce a Canadian nationalism rather than just regional nationalism. It is highly recommended that the federal government control social and cultural policy so that Canada can have a unified social culture. On the other hand, issues like job training, education, health care and social assistance should be controlled by the provinces but allow some federal oversight to make sure that all the provinces are getting adequate government funding to the need of each province. Centralization is important because it ensures that each province is running its government efficiently and that all provinces are getting the same resources

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