Case Study: The Meech Lake Accord

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Introduction
The Canadian Constitution, also known as the supreme law, describe Canada’s process of both codified and uncodified traditions as well as convention. It allows for the division of powers between federal and provincial powers and encompasses the rights and freedoms of all Canadians. The Meech Lake Accord was the first attempt to amend the newly patriated Constitution in order to facilitate changes depicted by the Constitution Act, 1982. The Meech Lake Accord was a set of constitutional amendments designed to persuade Quebec to accept the Canada Act. The accord was proposed by both Prime Minister Brian Mulroney and premier of Quebec, Robert Bourassa. The failures of Meech Lake have had vast impacts on conduct of current day politics, as well as describe the interprovincial relationships in Canada. Throughout this paper I will argue that demand for the Distinct Society clause by Quebec had an exclusionary impact on Canada’s aboriginal population due to a lack of consultation which together resulted in the failure of the Meech Lake Accord. The five main modification demanded of the accord for the Constitution by Quebec are the following: a recognition of the province of Quebec as a ‘distinct society”; a commitment to Canada’s bilingualism; increased provincial powers with respect to immigration; expansion of the
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This closed door approach to the political process caused allowed for little input or negotiations from others and ultimately led to the decline and fall of the Meech Lake Accord, which resulted from a number of failures in the eyes of the public. However, two distinct oppositions can be found as the cause of the collapse of the Meech Lake Accord such as the Distinct Society clause and the absence of aboriginal

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