The Quiet Revolution: Quebec's Separatist Movement

Improved Essays
Quebec has been viewed as an unique state compared to the rest of Canada for quite some time and by many individuals. Quebec 's separatist movement can be seen throughout Canadian history, from Justin Trudeau; the leader of the liberal party, saying ' 'Quebecers are better than the rest of Canada, because, you know, we’re Quebecers or whatever. ' ' during an interview, to the Quiet Revolution, Quebec views its self as its own country. It originally started with the Royal Proclamation of 1763, the first document that outlined how to govern the colony 's pre-Canada. It was unique wherein, the French lost New France to the English and yet, it protected the cultural integrity of what was to later become Quebec. From the beginning of Canada …show more content…
Rather than having the mindset of surviving by being the minority to Canada, they saw themselves with an aggressive expression of Quebecois Nationalism as the majority in Quebec. This became quite the backdrop of decentralization for Federalism in the post war context as provinces are becoming increasingly more important. Post 1960 's Quebec nationalism aimed to protect and promote the French language and culture, to increase the powers of the provincial government, and to remove the English Canadian economic domination in the province. The most important aspect of the Quiet Revolution was the rise of the new Quebecois middle class of civil servants; (person in the public sector employed for a government department or agency). Upward mobility was difficult in the English dominated private sector, the new middle class used Quebec nationalism to further their goals in the expansion of the Quebec state. Quebecois now looked to their provincial government instead of the Federals to protect their identity thus the creation of various bills to preserve the French Language and culture; such as Bill 22 where French became the first language in Quebec, or Bill 101 where French became the first language of government, in Quebec courts, and in the work place of

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    Canadian Identity Essay

    • 727 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Settled by the French, the region culturally borrowed many customs from its parent nation, even long after the initial settlement. When the British took control of Canadian colonies owned by the French in 1774, the divide began to form . The Quebecois spoke a different language and belonged to a different society and culture from their new rulers, much like other colonial territories owned by the British Empire. Quebec was allowed to keep its own legal system and system of land ownership, but was firmly British territory, as a predecessor of the techniques of indirect rule the British would employ in later colonies . The historical area Quebec occupied soon came to be settled by English speaking loyalists from the American thirteen colonies, as if Quebec were conquered for additional territory as part of empirical expansion.…

    • 727 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The selfish nation it was, Great Britain desired to abandon its British North American colonies, since Great Britain was faring well on its own. To do so, Great Britain encouraged the BNA colonies to unite as a British dependency through confederation. Yet, Canada as a young nation saw Britain’s encouragement as a prospective idea towards its nation-building and independence. With confederation, Canada achieved greater self-reliance while remaining loyal to the British Empire. British patriotism was preeminent in Canada, as Britain was their role model and used the British model as a guide in creating their government, laws, and military.…

    • 788 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Canada government try to change law more good for French Canadian. Also, Quebec have economic problem because of this issue but they made an effort for the survival of…

    • 1292 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    One major area of concern was linguistic intrusions. Portions of Canada engage in French conversations, therefore rules were designed to promote the security of their vernacular. English enterprises had to model cultural sensitivity by creating French-English signs with major, enlarged emphasis on the French. (Globalization 101. n.d., p. 25). These mandates would be of great concern in the publications industry.…

    • 931 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Nationhood In Canada

    • 727 Words
    • 3 Pages

    The discourse of “survivance” of the minority was further strengthened by the establishment of the Province of Canada in 1840, a majority English-speaking colony, and the limited seats for French Canadians in the National Assembly. This definition of nationhood tends more to the side of cultural nationhood but integrates the political as underrepresentation is central to the identity in the eyes of French…

    • 727 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    After Duplessis died, a new government took over French Canada, a liberal government came into power with a new set of ideas and the slogan “Time for change”. Jean Lesage stamped out corruption, he raised wages, brought unions, and government jobs became awarded through merit. Through this, the Liberals began to modernize Quebec’s economy, politics, education and culture. As the Liberal government took hold over more social services, the mentality of the citizens changed. Residents of Quebec were encouraged to think of themselves as citizens of the 20th century, their ideals began to transform and evolve, and the church’s impact declined.…

    • 1517 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    The same as Quebec, It got his power, and then it wanted to be sovereign. Ten years later, the Charlottetown Accord failed as well. Nowadays, though Quebec is still belong to Canada, the separatism in Quebec made…

    • 1309 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Great Essays

    Colonization Of Canada

    • 1305 Words
    • 6 Pages

    1. The French and the English were the two European powers that came into conflict over Canada, in order to obtain the land and it 's resources, namely the animal pelts and fish from the Atlantic coast. The resources in turn led to wealth and prestige back home, something both imperial powers vied for. 2. Canada was colonized later than the Caribbean and Central America because at the time it was considered little more than a remote northern outpost.…

    • 1305 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Considering his views towards Quebec, Trudeau said in 1968, “I am trying to put Quebec in its place, and the place of Quebec is in Canada.” Prior to becoming Prime Minister, Trudeau, was concerned about Quebec’s political state. To help the French feel more comfortable and accepted, Trudeau had made numerous comments towards the problem. He said, “Canada will be a strong country when Canadians of all provinces feel at home in all parts of the country, and when they feel that all Canada belongs to them.” Trudeau also created a French magazine, which he named, “Cité Libre” (Community of the Free), which gave details about democracy to help the citizens in Quebec. With his “Just Society”, Trudeau made it a main concern to make French Canadians feel more satisfied in civilization. With this in mind, Trudeau passed the Official Languages Act in 1969; making English and French Canada’s official languages.…

    • 1142 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    The new philosophy, called maître chez nous (masters in our house), was driven by desire for an equal partnership with English Canada. The most significant changes were that Québec became secular, the voting age was lowered from 21 to 18, the legal status of women was improved, the labour code was revised to provide protection for workers and unions, and a provincial pension plan was established for Quebecers (1964). The last change was a cause of discord between the French and the English because the latter participated in a federal pension plan and they wanted the French to do the same. The Quebecers chose to defy Ottawa in this and in many other ways as well. For instance, Québec formed its own embassies in other countries instead of being part of Canadian embassies.…

    • 1755 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Superior Essays

Related Topics