Puerperal fever

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    simple projects. Specifically, the timelines echoed the limiting philosophy that the status quo is the only reasonable path, a sentiment many feel pressured by. This outlook on life can result in thought errors and obstruction of growth. To illustrate the contrast of positive thinking that results from ability to change, and the negative thinking that is caused by the inability to wander from expectations and previous theories we turn to several readings: Atul Gewande’s “Suggestions for Becoming a Positive Deviant”, which exemplifies positive thinking, and examples of negative thinking, the academic life of N.S. Shaler, as explained in Stephan Jay Gould’s “In A Jumbled Drawer”, and the failings that contributed to the continuation of puerperal fever epidemic, as detailed in Sherwin B. Nuland’s The Doctors’ Plague. Additionally, examples of positive thinking stemming from rejection of the status quo are observed in William James’ “On a Certain Blindness in Human Beings” and Malcom X’s “Saved”. Of course, this essay is not to shame having goals or being consistent; these principles are important. However, thinking of life as only a series of linear, obstinate goals is pernicious. Thus, the alacrity to change and the willingness to diverge from societal expectations are exceedingly important to success. Often, willingness to enact change is necessary for improvement of a system or an individual. When an institution or a person is opposed to change, opportunities for advancement…

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    Incautious Doctors Throughout the medical history, preventing or curing a disease was one of the hardest dilemmas that doctors face. According to Nuland’s novel, The Doctor’s Plague, where a group of obstetrical doctors came together at Vienna’s general hospital, Allgemeine Krankenhaus, in order to figure out the leading causes of childbed fever epidemic (Nuland). It took them years and decades to find out the roots of the disease. They conducted several theories and experiments to come up a…

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    contamination. A large number of cases of intestinal infections and a considerable number of cases of typhoid fever occurring during the month of May lead to exhaustive chemical and bacteriological examination of he water.”(1905) This annual report suggested that “the heavy rains which occurred in April carried out large quantities of sewage into the lake, and this quantity greater than previous time because the river had not been flushed for some time. “(1905) It also stated that along with…

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    American doctors and most people do not question their doctors. In some countries this is not the case. In other countries around the world, there is less use of doctors to cure sicknesses. Instead the people, who are sick, go see shamans or herbalists. The article Healing Herbs and Dangerous Doctors Fruit Fever and Community Conflicts with Biomedical Care in Northeast Thailand discussed the different views of the medical system. There were several interviews that were performed by the author…

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    Vulnificus Research Paper

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    Typical clinical signs of V. vulnificus infections include fever, chills, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, septic shock, and characteristic skin lesions [15]. These characteristic skin lesions include lower extremity cellulitis with ecchymosis and bullae. Since the organism can cross the intestinal mucosa rapidly, development of bullous skin lesions of the lower extremities can occur within the first 24 hours after onset of illness [16]. This onset if often thought of as an early manifestation of…

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    Summary Of Rush By Devize

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    Like Rush, Devéze wrote an account about the fever and its victims throughout the duration of the epidemic. In, An enquiry into, and observations upon the causes and effects of the epidemic disease, Devéze wrote his theory for the cause of the fever and all of the treatments he conducted at Bush Hill. There is an element in his notes that is not seen in Rush’s. Devéze wrote specific details about his patients. The medical notes of Rush do not include the details like Devéze provides. In a…

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    contact with a person’s mouth. When doctors are diagnosing mono they usually get a blood sample. The doctors examine the blood sample for more white blood cells, lymphocytes, than normal. They also look for atypical liver functions. Symptoms will occur 2-7 weeks after exposure to the bacteria. Average symptoms will last 1-3 weeks. The 1st symptoms are usually mistaken for the cold or flu. These symptoms include headaches, tiredness, chills, and puffy itchy eyes. The 2nd symptoms are much…

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    Mammals and birds develop “an elevated body temperature,” or fever, in response to certain viral and bacterial infections (Reece, 2014). Fever also increases the standard range for the biological thermostat because the hypothalamus shifts the normal body temperature set point upward (Mayo Clinic, 2014). Natural fluctuations occur in human body temperatures based on factors such as the time of day, but the normal body temperature is approximately 98.6 degrees Fahrenheit (Nalin, 2017). Increasing…

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    Influenza Research Paper

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    fomites then touches their mouth eyes or nose or by simply inhaling the droplets of that said individual from when they sneeze or cough. This can occur in close proximity or from as far as 6ft away (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2015) and “studies have shown that human flu viruses generally can survive on surfaces between two and eight hours” (National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, 2015c, para. 2). The flu is highly contagious and an affected individual can spread…

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    Introduction Fever in children is a typical side effect of various restorative conditions, most strikingly irresistible maladies. In spite of not being characteristically risky, it can cause uneasiness in parents and caregivers alike, and it is one of the main reasons why parents look to medical care. Evidence-based guidelines reliably express that the side effect of fever does not require treating and, therefore, the point ought to be to distinguish those children with a serious ailment and…

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