Hippolytus

Sort By:
Decent Essays
Good Essays
Better Essays
Amazing Essays
Best Essays
    Page 1 of 5 - About 47 Essays
  • Better Essays

    A tragic hero is not equivalent to the heroes that people think of today. A tragic hero does not necessarily display courage, bravery, and strength in grim times, making them different than the heroic characters people think of today. Many famous Greek playwrights wrote about tragic heroes, but each one chose to focus on different characteristics, depending on how they defined a tragic hero. This is why when examining the characters Oedipus, in Oedipus the King (Sophocles), and Hippolytus, in Hippolytus (Euripides), and comparing their actions to Aristotle’s definition of a tragic hero, many differences are found, but some consistent similarities. Although, this does not mean that one definition is more correct than the other, instead…

    • 1309 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Better Essays

    The two articles, Men and Gods in Euripides’ Hippolytus by C.A.E Luschnig and Human and Divine Action in Euripides’ Hippolytus by Jerker Blomqvist, both focus on the divine and mortal characters within the play Hippolytus. In this review I will summarise each article as I understand and assess each authors argument. In his article, Luschnig takes the view that the characters and motivation of said characters, both human and divine, are so parallel that they form one single frame of action…

    • 1348 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Better Essays

    version involving Hippolytus and Phaedra being a source for many Greek tragedies. The story is all about the misdirected passions the character’s experience: Hippolytus and his passion against women and sexual love, Phaedra and her passion for her stepson, and Theseus’ eventual passion to destroy his own flesh and blood. Euripides had written two different versions, the second being meant to tone-down the raciness of the first and happens to be the only one that survived. It’s believed that…

    • 1341 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    renowned tragedian Euripides in 428 BCE, the Ancient Greek tragedy Hippolytus is the ultimate story of betrayal and desire. Euripides’ style of tragedy is often compared to the works of the other two major playwrights of the era, Aeschylus and Sophocles, yet it differs greatly. His writing style is simple and can be communicated in colloquial speech: Euripides was known for taking a new approach to traditional myths: he often changed elements of their stories or portrayed the more fallible,…

    • 1144 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    literally and figuratively. One of his most critically acclaimed works, Hippolytus, is consistent with other playwrights’ works in that it largely focuses on characters that ultimately…

    • 1911 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    In classical Greek mythology, Phaedra is the daughter of King Minos of Crete and Pasiphaë, and is the wife of Theseus. Due to a divine plan set into motion by Aphrodite, Phaedra falls in love with Hippolytus, Theseus’ son from another marriage, bringing about the destruction of both individuals. These themes of incest, fate, and adultery are all present in Desire Under the Elms. This play can be shown to have been influenced greatly by classical representations of this myth. Desire Under the…

    • 1231 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Greek drama shows many instances of female sexuality and the negative connotation associated with it. Through props and tone expressed in lines 190- 585 of Hippolytus, Euripides explicitly addresses the role of woman as an “anti-model” through Greek society’s strict expectations of female sexuality. When female sexuality is controlled, the ultimate goal of patriarchy will succeed in Greek society. First and foremost, Froma Zeitlin introduces the idea of an “anti-model” in Playing the Other…

    • 1185 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Hippolyta Research Paper

    • 632 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Hippolyta was born in ancient Athens and commenced her life as a plain-looking girl.She simply lived with her mother at that time. unfortunately, a few months before childbirth Hippolyta’s mother was diagnosed with cancer. Consequently, she barely had a few months to spend quality time with her child because during that time period before she grievously died. Now at this time, the people of Athens didn't have a situation like this, Hippolyta was the first Athen to be a child and not have her own…

    • 632 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Hippolytus Myths

    • 1308 Words
    • 6 Pages

    but evolved with different versions and were manipulated to highlight different values and ideologies. I agree with the statement and will argue that the myths of Hippolytus and the foundation myths of Roman were used by ancient societies to bind its members into a cohesive unit. This essay will explore the ways in which myth were used to bring members of an ancient society together by instigating and reinforcing civic identity and pride. Explore how the role of myths defined and unified the…

    • 1308 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Love can manifest itself in many ways, but some types of love are socially unacceptable, like a romantic or erotic love between family members. This type of taboo love occurs in the ancient Greek play Hippolytus and the 1962 film Phaedra when a stepmother falls in love with her stepson. And although the situations and themes appear similar on a surface level, when analyzing them further, it becomes easy to see that they are quite different. Hippolytus, written by Euripides and first performed…

    • 2005 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Previous
    Page 1 2 3 4 5