Substance Abuse Essay

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  • Stigma Of Substance Abuse

    Substance abuse has become a major epidemic in our country and there is a dire need for immediate intervention. 20 million Americans suffer from a substance use disorder and hundreds pass away in silence each day (Addiction is a Chronic Illness, Not Character Flaw, 2016). The negative stigma behind drug addiction causes many addicts to deter from seeking help and treatment for fear of being judged for their disorder. The distinction of substance abuse from other medical issues also makes it difficult for addicts to take steps towards treatment as they would for a physical health problem. Moreover, the lack of treatment space for substance abusers further complicates the strive towards reducing drug addiction mortality rates. Also, the fact…

    Words: 786 - Pages: 4
  • Substance Abuse Report

    SUBSTANCE USE, ABUSE AND DEPENDENCY RESEARCH REPORT BY JESSICA WITTMAN DATE SUBMITTED ENG 4C MRS. CROOKE Table of Contents ABTRACT ……………………………………………………………...1 INTRODUCTION 2 SUBSTANCE AND ABUSE RISKS/ FACTORS 3 DIFFERENT TYPES OF SUBSTANCES 4 SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS 5 TREATMENT, DIAGNOSES AND WHEN TO SEEM MEDICAL CARE 6 WORKS CITED……………………………………………………………7 ABSTRACT The purpose of this research report is to explain and identify the many different…

    Words: 1209 - Pages: 5
  • Substance Abuse And Addiction

    As stated by The World Health Organization (WHO), substance use disorders stand for the unsafe or risky use of any substances, including inhalants, solvents, alcohol and other illicit drugs that have mood-altering or intoxication properties. Moreover, drug consumption can lead to addiction, which is a cluster of diverse manifestations that develop after repetitive substance abuse and that characteristically include a strong craving to take the drug, complications in controlling its habit,…

    Words: 996 - Pages: 4
  • Effects Of Crime By Substance Abuse

    Peugh, J. (1998). Fighting crime by treating substance abuse. Issues In Science & Technology, 15(1), 53. Retrieved January 25, 2016, from http://web.a.ebscohost.com/ehost/detail/detail?sid=b2fb5777-5139-45e7-868c-e63777f3450c%40sessionmgr4003&vid=0&hid=4204&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d#AN=1238553&db=rch Search Engine: Canadian Reference Centre (Virtual Library) Keywords: “Drug abuse” and “crime” This scholarly journal article is written for a mature audience that is interested on how…

    Words: 1811 - Pages: 8
  • The Importance Of Substance Abuse In Nursing

    Sullivan (2013) addressed how “one of the most challenging problems for managers is knowing what to do when employees fail to perform to expectations” (p. 258). There are a number of issues that could arise for the nurse manager but this paper will focus on dealing with substance abuse in the nursing profession. Statistics show that 1 in 7 Registered Nurses (RNs) are at risk for addiction and that RNs have a 50% higher rate of substance abuse than the general public (Epstein, et al., 2010). This…

    Words: 1278 - Pages: 5
  • Gender Differences On Substance Abuse

    In this paper I will be addressing the gender difference on substance abuse; looking into what makes a specific gender more prevalent to alcohol and drug dependency. According to many of the scholarly articles I’ve read men are much more likely to have chemical dependency issues. Looking deeper in the issue I found that there may be a link between society and these dependencies as well as some genes in men that aren’t in women. According to The Psychiatric Clinics of North America the…

    Words: 1143 - Pages: 5
  • The Stigma Of Substance Abuse Disorders

    Although the SAMHSA national reports constantly indicate a significant number of individuals living with substance related disorders, alcohol and drug addiction is still highly stigmatized in today’s society. Those suffering from mental illness, which encompasses substance abuse disorders, face immense disadvantages due to perceived, enacted, and self-stigma (Luoma, Kohlenberg, Hayes, Bunting, & Rye, 2008; Luoma, et al., 2007). Perceived stigma is the tendency for stigmatized individuals to…

    Words: 721 - Pages: 3
  • Substance Abuse Case Study

    He either reveals the truth about his substance dependence and rehabilitation treatment to Dr. Brownlee or he conceals the truth with the backpacking story. If I advise Jim to disclose the missing information, there is a possibility that Dr. Brownlee will not extend his employment offer. However, I would want to believe that Dr. Brownlee’s character is not prejudiced and that he would see past the incidence that took place almost a decade ago. The fact, that Jim during his struggle with the…

    Words: 833 - Pages: 4
  • Substance Abuse Treatment Plan

    Intro In the United States, “8 million people met the criteria for a “substance use disorder” (Smith, M., Stocks, C., & Santora, pg. 109). A treatment plan is a “written document about a person’s substance abuse, and how a health care professional plans to treat them” (Stevens & Jones, pg. 168). The details within the treatment plan “look at what is causing the persons substance abuse problems and what treatments are planned to treat this problem” (Stevens & Jones, pg. 168). Clearly, since…

    Words: 1646 - Pages: 7
  • Substance Abuse And The Family Analysis

    In the book, ‘Substance Abuse and the Family” by Michael D. Reiter stresses on how the family structure regulates around the use of substance and the abuse cause from it. In chapter 14, he stresses about family recovery and the recovery process in which the family must take to restructure the family and their rules where they have an open honest relationship due to communicating. Brown and Lewis presented a four-stage developmental model of recovery for families dealing with alcoholism. The…

    Words: 865 - Pages: 4
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