The Statistical Analysis Of Hackman And Oldham's Job Characteristics Model

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The main summation of the six articles in questions all point back to the significance and need for Hackman and Oldham’s Job Characteristics Model (JCM) as well as the utilization of job re-design based off of these findings. The JCM was originally created as a means to offer different principles that can be implemented at an organization to enrich the workplace for those involved. The JCM is essentially a work questionnaire that uses the information found to create statistical data in order to show the perceived amount of job motivation in employees. The first theory proposed five different job characteristics that could play a role in effecting the ‘outcomes’ based off of three different psychological states (Hackman and Oldham, 1975; Hackman …show more content…
Through their findings they were able to create a statistical analysis of results and create a way to narrow out which areas could use improvements in order to create a better workplace for the employees and their psychological states. The survey results are focused around three different psychological states, or ‘outcomes,’ which the duo find to be most prevalent in an organization with high positive motivational factors. The three states break down into: Meaningfulness of work (breaking into three additional factors of: skill variety, task identity, and task significance), responsibility, and knowledge of outcomes (Hackman and Oldham, 1975; Hackman and Oldham, …show more content…
As Hackman and Oldham make clear in their 1975 article, the Job Characteristics Model is meant to be used prior to the initiation of a job re-design. The motivation levels should be looked at prior to any re-design as well as after it has been implemented in order to properly assess effects made (Hackman and Oldham, 1975). It should be used as a way to diagnose the need for any re-design purposes and likewise must be the first step in the process to fully comprehending any issues that should be addressed in the organization (Hackman and Oldham,

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