The Six Principles Of Effective Adults Training

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When companies define learning needs, effective training should be delivered immediately. Otherwise, companies cannot fill gaps of lack of knowledge. In order to delivering effective training, companies should consider the six principles of delivering effective adults training. Research explains that adults remember most of knowledge when actual practice has been done, accounting for 90%. Besides, adults learners are not will to be taught, but to be facilitated. By facilitating knowledge, those learners will be motivated because it can create ice-breakers by creating sharing environment. Moreover, since adults are self-directed and decision makers, it is possible to leave white space during the training for individual thinking. The last but …show more content…
According to Kirkpatricks (2006), there are four levels to evaluate learning and development activities, namely reaction, learning, behavior and results. Through the evaluation, trainers can conduct valuable framework of training content and to make improvement for the next training, while trainees can receive effective training and improve capabilities afterwards. However, training evaluation model discussed by Kirkpatrick has some limitations, one of those limitations is there are not necessarily casual relations between each level, but Kirkpatrick himself implied that there were links between those levels, which may mislead trainers focus so much on the casual relationships of each level that the more important training evaluation may be ignored (Alliger and Janak, 1989). Consequently, evaluating training should be conducted after delivering training, but the limitations cannot be ignored in order to make precise …show more content…
Usually, sharing knowledge contains two main parts: knowledge donating and collecting (Van den Hooff and De Ridder, 2004). Knowledge donating refers to individuals are willing to demonstrate personal knowledge and skills to others, while collecting refers to encourage others to share ideas (Naim and Lenkla, 2016). But, employees sometimes do not want to demonstrate the knowledge or to be persuaded to share ideas because of some personal reasons. For example, one of the influential reasons is the culture barriers. Culture includes norms, rules or processes. This indicates that some corporate culture may not value knowledge sharing. Therefore, once the knowledge sharing process begins, those who are not value knowledge sharing may be demotivated. To solve this problem, mentoring would be a good way. Mentoring can help employees know easily what the organizational values. Meanwhile, mentoring usually happens when mentor guide the student so that it allows more private space for employee to get used to the organizational culture, and then eliminate the culture barriers (Sharma and Freeman, 2014). Moreover, both junior employees and senior employees can benefits from mentoring because it can demonstrate clear structure of informal training to junior employees and satisfy senior employees by providing opportunities of facilitating (Hicks and McCracken, 2009).

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