Utopia In Animal Farm By George Orwell

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Imagine thinking that all the citizens in a society have finally abandoned any selfish aims and are working towards a world where everyone will benefit immensely. Whoever or whatever organization is in charge of that society will be the deciding factor in whether the society will thrive or fail. When pondering what a successful society consists of, some qualities that spring to mind first are selfless leaders, equally valued citizens, and collaboration towards improvements that will benefit the whole community. Qualities such as these are often considered to be crucial aspects of the idea of a utopia, which is the unattainable idea of the perfect society. Due to the fact that utopias are impossible to achieve, many societies ultimately decline …show more content…
The base of the animals’ fear of the outside world is the treachery of mankind, which is derived from rumors that the pigs spread. Orwell illustrates this when writing, “He had flogged an old horse to death, he starved his cows, he had killed a dog by throwing it into the furnace, he amused himself in the evenings by making cocks fight with splinters of razor−blade tied to their spurs” (Orwell 96). These rumors of Mr. Frederick’s treatment of his animals are used to strike fear into the animals on the farm. By having such elaborated rumors about the humans outside the farm, the animals fear for their own safety, and are repulsed by how animalkind is treated. These rumors unfairly trick them into believing that their current situation is wonderful in comparison. The pigs continue to manipulate this fear through their speeches to the animals. When attempting to justify the pigs’ actions, Squealer exclaims, “Yes, Jones would come back! Surely, comrades, there is no one among you who wants to see Jones come back?" (Orwell 36). Squealer uses the animals’ fear of humans returning to the farm to keep them in line. Their fear of humans coming back is so severe that they follow along with whatever they are told to, pushing aside any doubts that they may have. The pigs’ continual exploitation of the animals’ fear warps the farm to their desires, further damaging the …show more content…
The animals living in horrible conditions are tasked with nearly impossible working hours and brutal living circumstances. The animals’ inhumane lifestyles are described as, “They knew that life nowadays was harsh and bare, that they were often hungry and often cold, and that they were usually working when they were not asleep” (Orwell 113). The animals are not allowed basic necessities, and are struggling every day. Rather than receiving the easy life that was advertised to them, they suffer relentlessly from an easily avoidable situation. The animals do not deserve this hardship, but instead deserve to be treated with basic care and consideration. In addition to intense work loads and living conditions, the pigs further endanger the animals’ lives. The events of one of these grave meetings are described when George Orwell illustrates, “When they had finished their confession, the dogs promptly tore their throats out, and in a terrible voice Napoleon demanded whether any other animal had anything to confess” (Orwell 84). The pigs’ brutally massacre the animals on the farm for confessing to often minor crimes. As a result of the unjustified killings, the animals live in fear of the pigs and what they might do to the rest of the animals. The pigs exploit this fear to continue to do whatever they desire. This drastic difference

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