Four Way Case Study In Nursing

1550 Words 6 Pages
“Nursing is a profession that has its own code of conduct, its own philosophic views, and its own place in the health care team… Nurses work under their own license. That means that nurses are completely responsible for their work (Butts & Rich, 2016, p. 71).” It is important for nurses to employ the use of ethics to make a decision. Ethics requires deeper evaluation of each individual situation and is influenced by both nursing standards and the standards of the individual. The Four-Way Method is a good way to analyze the situation and is used to analyze our case study. We evaluated both of the case studies and they brought up interesting topics to discuss. We chose the first case study to evaluate deeper. The case study involves a 48 year …show more content…
Controversial topics and life changing decisions are just a part of a normal shift. The best way to approach these tough topics is to use the four ways of ethical thinking. We found it to be a benefit to write down and organize the truths, consequences, fairness and character. The first part of the evaluation is truth. The facts need to be evaluated in detail. The Four Topics approach aids in clearer understanding of the facts. Facts can be organized into four topics to make decision making easier: medical indications, patient preferences, quality of life, and contextual features are the four categories (Butts & Rich, 2016, p. 63). Medical indications in this case study include: patient has cancer of the bowel, cancer has metastasized to the liver and is undergoing another surgery, and he has previously undergone radiation. Also included in this category is the fact that his physician recommended he “put his affairs in order.” He has created a living will/advanced directive. Patient preference facts for this case study include his preference for no “extraordinary measures” be used to keep him alive. The case study does not state if he is mentally and legally able to make this decision; however, for this paper we assume that he is. Quality of life facts are not really given. Contextual feature facts include: he is only 48 and has two children, his wife feels that it should be “up to the doctors to decide.” Also included in this …show more content…
We must keep in mind the patient’s personality and motivation. Have they made their decisions to prevent being a burden or have an effect on their family? The patient may have chosen the decision based on outcomes for themselves. Mr. C may have decided he has suffered enough and feels it would be better to pass away in peace instead of suffer on life support. The choices should be made with a clear mind and not based off of emotions such as fear, anger, or resentment. All solutions should be able to be “enacted virtuously, motivated by good will, and build trusting relationships (D. Hatteberg, daily content outline).” Our solution of politely and respectfully stating our opinions would do this. This solution is done out of caring and compassion. It is also done once a trusting relationship has been created but will still build it up. Not saying anything may not build the trust of the patient. Going against personal and professional nursing values may create distance between nurse and patient. It does however come from a place of good will. Our personal value of honesty would not be represented by not saying anything. Caring is another value that can only be represented by politely and respectfully discussing opinions. By discussing with the patient, a relationship is established and this shows the patient that we car. Relationships with patients is an aspect of the ANA Code of Ethics. This portion emphasizes respecting a client/patient’s

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