Is There A Link Between Poverty And Educational Achievement?

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Poor people have limited accessibility to education services. Thus, countries, which have numerous people living by make 1,25 dollar per a day or less, has really low rates of education level. In the light of this, it could be claimed that poverty is an important social problem, because it forbids people to be educated. In relation to that, statistics indicate there is a positive relationship between poverty and education achievement meaning if the income level increases, the education will increase accordingly. The study of U.S. Educational Testing Service (ETS) remarks this relationship by noting “ families with more income are better able to purchase inputs such as nutritious meals, safer neighborhoods, and better schools, thus positively …show more content…
In other words, because of the fact that poor people have limited accessibility to health services, they become more likely to open to various types of diseases. United Nation’s researches demonstrate concerning the poor kids that “almost 600 children died every day of AIDS-related causes in 2012” (UNDP, 2014). Therefore, it can be argued that poverty has a direct link with different kind of diseases like communicable and noncommunicable diseases. Communicable diseases can be exemplified as HIV/AIDS and hepatitis. However, noncommunicable diseases are the ones, which are not transmissible and caused by injury. World Health Organization (WHO) defines noncommunicable type as a “disease of affluences” (WHO, 2006). The statistics are shown in the study of WHO those both communicable and noncommunicable diseases have a tendency to be higher in the poorest regions of the Earth (WHO, 2006). Thus, it could be claimed from here that an economic structure that creates poverty makes those people be more vulnerable to be get sick or injured. After they get sick, recovery from that illness or disases become much harder for poor people in relative to others who have health insurance or money to see doctor by paying charges individually. The cost of doctors’ fees and drugs, also transportation cost to the nearest hospital could be devastating to poor adults who are obliged to pay for treatment. A great percent of those poor families pick up their children from school to make them work in factories or even to start begging. United Nation’s researches indicate “more than one in four children in developing regions entering primary school is likely to drop out” (UNDP, 2014). Even though the way of making money differs from family to family; the aim remains same that all of those people make an effort to cover treatment expenses of the one who they are obliged to look after. Even though

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