The Cognitive Stage Model

773 Words 4 Pages
Paul Fitts and Michael Posner created a 3 stage model and suggested any learning of a new motor skill involves this model (Magill 2014). During the first stage, known as the Cognitive Stage, the novice learner will try to familiarize with the movement. The learner will analyze the objective of the movement, what they are trying to accomplish, and how to do it. This first stage of the model will be accompanied with numerous of errors and lack of consistency. Also seen in this stage, the learner will pay attention to the instructions as much as possible, as well as searching for feedback on their performance. An example of a learner in the cognitive stage will be someone learning to throw a ball for the first time. As they go through the movement …show more content…
During this stage the motor skill will become second nature to the learner. Performers on this stage are able to perform the skill unconsciously and consistency is seen throughout every trial. Minimal errors are seen throughout this stage and if an error occurs, the performer is able to detect it and make adjustments without any need of guidance. Often a performer is able to concentrate on other detail surrounding him or her which are non-related to the movement being performed. The learning who was learning how to throw is successfully performing the skill at a higher level. Instead of throwing faster and further, the learner is able to throw more accurate due to biomechanical improvement incorporated into their performance. Fitts and Posner models do not include a set time table which suggest when the performer will be in a particular stage of the model. For example, not all performers will reach the Autonomous Stage of this …show more content…
I didn 't want to experience any sense of failure when my group would implement the activity plan at the site. Sense of failure; would have been receiving negative feedback from the children who participated in our activity. As the semester progressed, my motivation to engage and succeed in this course changed dramatically. My motivation transitioned from not wanting to fail to wanting to succeed in teaching the children how to properly perform the motor skills we were implementing. One of the main reasons as to why my motivation transitioned to wanting the children to succeed is due to my coaching experience in volleyball. Teaching the children the manipulative motor skills reminded me of when I would have to teach manipulative motor skills used in volleyball to my athletes. I would find joy seeing my athletes release excitement when they would successfully perform the movement. As the semester progressed, I would find the same joy when the children would show excitement when succeeding at the movement. Such as, when we implemented our catching activity, one of the children Jovanny, showed excitement when he was able catch the ball repetitively. Though, I still wanted to succeed in this course by receiving a letter A grade, however, most of my motivation to continue to engage in this service learning

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