Employer Perspective Survey

1360 Words 6 Pages
This August, the Institute for Public Policy Research (IPPR) publish the report Remember the Young Ones, in which the statistics show that there are 868,000 young British (75%) aged 16-24 are out of work and 247,000 have been seeking for jobs for more than one year. [1] Last May, study conducted by the Trades Union Congress have reached a similar conclusion. 395,000 jobs are urgently needed to fully employ the 18-24-year-old again. [2] The soaring number of the unemployed and the enormous job shortfalls delineate the gloomy and bleak employment prospect for UK youth. With the aim of resolving the long-term unemployment, the UK government, policymakers and educators have already provided extra help and support. Programs like Work Programme, …show more content…
[3] When hiring new staffs, the methods used by employers fall into two categories: formal methods such as advertising through media, use of employment agencies and use of Jobcentre Plus and informal ones, for instance, personal recommendation through word of mouth. [4] However, both methods form a barrier a real barrier in employment. For a start, the formal recruitment methods are not well utilized. The 2012 Employer Perspective Survey undertaken by the UK commissions clearly demonstrates the relatively low extent of use and effectiveness of formal methods. Take the government funded agency Jobcentre plus as an example, by comparing Figure 1, 2 and 3[5], a conclusion can be easily draw that although Jobcentre Plus is the most popular method, its proportion of recruits obtained is well below that achieved by word of mouth recommendation with a huge gap of approximate 20%. This suggests that employers still prefer to employ informal methods to meet majority of their needs. Thus, young adults are forced to confront the dilemma of applying with no …show more content…
By analyzing Figure 4 and 5 from UKCEPS 2012, It is not hard to conclude that the proportion of employers who are glad to offer work experience or internships in the last few years are relatively low with only about a quarter. And the share of internships available in almost every sector is far lower than the share of work placements offered by colleges and schools. [12] During the past two decades, the share full-time learners at 16-24 in employment has witnessed a continued decease, which is shown in Figure 6. [13] Just as what the UKCEPS has figured out, the recent trends “suggests that the lack experience amongst young people may be worsening”.

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