Importance Of The Equal Rights Amendment

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“Equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or any state on account of sex,” reads the Equal Rights Amendment. Women in the United States of America did not have many rights before 1919. However, in the early 1920’s, the Equal Rights Amendment was created for the benefit of America’s women. The amendment was dedicated to equality for women, for equality to be included inside of the Constitution, and to support women’s rights. Even today, the Equal Rights Amendment remains controversial.
The Equal Rights Amendment was founded by Alice Paul on July 20th, 1923. The Amendment was taken to Congress by Senator Charles Curtis and Representative Daniel R. Anthony Jr. on December 10th, 1923. Paul supported
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She thought that the amendment would keep Congress and the rest of the United States from passing certain legislation that she thought working women needed. Roosevelt’s opinion on the Equal Rights Amendment could have been a factor in keeping the amendment from passing. The Civil Rights Act of 1964 gave working women payments for supporting the Equal Rights Amendment. This was because, now, women could support themselves and their children with a full time job, something women had not ever been able to do in the past. Women began to see the importance in the Equal Rights Amendment. In 1967, Alice Paul convinced the National Organization for Women (also known as NOW) to endorse the Equal Rights Amendment. 20 NOW leaders interrupted the United States Senate Subcommittee in February 1970, demanding for the entire Congress to hear the Equal Rights Amendment. Because of this, later in 1970, the Senate Subcommittee started to have Equal Rights Amendment …show more content…
One of these committees worked for the more popular efforts; different state members supported the amendment with state-based awareness. The other committee took a closer look at how the Equal Rights Amendment affected the states that had passed it in their own way.
At the next NOW conference in 1994, there was a meeting to discuss the strategy for the Equal Rights Amendment. Activists came up with a new Equal Rights Amendment, which would include reproductive rights and abortion, no matter what a person’s sexual orientation is.
In 1995, Equal Rights Amendment supporters pushed unratified states to hand over ratification bills. The unratified states in which the amendment needed bills from were Arizona, Arkansas, Florida, Illinois, Mississippi, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Virginia. Because of the demand of ratification bills in these states, the amendment was introduced in lots of Legislature sessions.
NOW members voted in 1996 to support a new Equal Rights Amendment, called the “Constitutional Equality Amendment.” This amendment prohibited sexism, homophobia, and racism; it also banned discrimination against marital status, ethnicity, national origin, color, or

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