I-O Psychology Case Study

2975 Words 12 Pages
INTRODUCTION For May Semester 2015, OUM learners who taking the subject ABPS3203 Industrial And Organisational Psychology, are required to study on personnel selection, mainly on both, objective and subjective selection techniques. Industrial and organizational psychology, which is also known as I–O psychology, is the scientific study of human behaviour in the workplace and applies psychological theories and principles to organizations (Wikipedia, 2 July 2015). According to Blum & Naylor (1968), industrial and organisational psychology is a fact and the application of psychological principles related to human and organizational or employee. When given reinforcement or punishment, he will learn faster and change his behaviour. …show more content…
If not, a nice workplace may turn frustrating. I-O psychology is a study of the relation between workplace environment, organizations and the employees. Strictly, I-O psychology focused on two different areas that are closely linked. The professionals might equate it to yin and yang, which can’t exist without each other. Firstly, the industrial side of I-O psychology concentrated on the link between the individuals and workplace, which include job analysis, employee hiring system, employee safety, employee training and job performance measurement. Secondly, the organizational side of I-O psychology concentrated on the workplace and organization as a whole. Developing productivity and boosting the organization’s performance are always covered under this side of I-O psychology. The professionals concerned at how an organization might influence an individual’s behaviour, involve the studies on interpersonal relationships. The employees’ recruitment and selection process are very important for an organization. The selection of the right employee for the right position is able to help an organization in its …show more content…
Situational interview questions give interviewers sharp visions into your respond to a specific situation you may face on the job. These types of questions are designed to draw out more of your analytical and problem-solving skills, as well as how you handle problems with short notice and minimal preparation (Hansen, n.d.). According to Hansen (n.d.), situational interviews focus on a hypothetical situation. For example, the interview asks, “How would you handle…” Petras (n.d.) said “It’s easy to list skills and accomplishments on your resume. Now you need to demonstrate to the satisfaction of the interviewer how you successfully go about solving problems, resolving conflicts, and making things

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