History Of Saint Francis Of Assisi: The Collision Of Classes

754 Words 4 Pages
The Collision of Classes Beginning in the mid 1100’s and going into the early 1200’s, there was a simultaneous and consistent movement of poor and professional people as new emphasis was put on living a life closer to one like Christ would have lived because of the new Cistercian monks versus the established Benedictine monks as well as the monastic population versus the papacy. The well-established black robed monks of the time thrived on intricate Romanesque architecture and complicated masses occurring multiple times per day. Benedictine monks thrived on grandeur from their liturgical processions and architecture. In contrast, the new Cistercian monks were the epitome of simplicity for the Middle Ages. Their garments were pure white …show more content…
Mass was only allowed once a day. The only thing not simple about them was their “spirituality of intense personal emotion” (Rosenwein, Short History, 189). It is pointed out that they poured their love for Christ out into prayer and writing. They worked to be on the Earth but not of the Earth. Cistercian monks found their inspiration through different apostolic orders. One is the Rule of Saint Francis of Assisi. Francis of Assisi (1182-1226) was dedicated to simplicity. His life of poverty gained followers rapidly and ultimately demanded for an official order for the group, who were known as the Franciscans. To summarize, the rule mandated the Franciscans live in poverty, chastity, lead simple worship services, receive no money, and refrain from appropriating. Another example of this simple life is that of the Beguines. These communities of women led monastic-like lives, but took no religious vows. They did, however, live extremely passionate lives like Mary of Oignies. “…She found such grace of compunction and wept so abundantly that the tears which …show more content…
Rosenwein parallels medical professionals to popes. Simply put, professionals are anyone who has mastered a specific craft. Therefore, Popes can be considered professionals, as they have become masters of Christianity. Pope Innocent III (1198-1216) was well educated in theology and law. He become a leader of the church and ran a council, which stated the exact nature of Christianity. Pope Innocent III has a strong correlation with the papal monarchy. Innocent acted more like a representative of Christ and his “apostles” were his bishops. The professionals were supporters of the papal monarchy. This “ecclesiastical administration” was powerful and essentially a government aside from the actual secular

Related Documents