Pope Gregory VII: Gregorian Reform

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Pope Gregory VII Often considered one of the most influential and controversial popes of the Middle Ages, Gregory VII became pope after a long career in the papal court. Historians have claimed that the papacy of Gregory VII is so important and must be emphasized, they have coined the term “Gregorian Reform”. Gregory VII played an important role in Europe during his time, and was a major contributor both before and after his election to the reform. When discussing the biography of Pope Gregory VII, there are many key topics one must address. Through the reading one will inspect the early life of Gregory VII and his life before becoming pope, how Gregory VII became pope, his accomplishments as pope, as well as how Pope Gregory VII died. Pope …show more content…
Gregory VII was one of the most profound popes of the medieval church, whose name entitles the 11th century movement known as the Gregorian Reform. During this time, he was the reform, changing the very foundation of the papacy, fighting for a more aggressive and proactive papacy. “Gregory VII identified three issues as key to the Church’s corruption: the sale of sacred office, the marriage of priests and, above all, the interference of powerful laymen in clerical appointments.” As pope, Gregory VII positioned took the positioned based on the fact that if the church remains unable to choose its own leaders, free from interference, then it will always remain entangled in the politics and money, never fully capable to encourage priests to preach and spread the Gospel to a forever sinful …show more content…
He called for bishops and priest all over Italy to be present for a twice a year synod in Rome. “Gregory used these synods to map out the reforms, which participants were then expected to implement in their own regions: the purging of unchaste clergy, the ordination of devout and competent priests, the abolition of the sale of sacred things and offices.” Gregory saw himself as God’s caretaker on earth, ordered to take care and watch over the whole church. He sent out hundreds of letters to rulers and heads of churches in many countries, trying to look out for and protect the rights of Christians who lived in Muslim territory. “The cause was not won by Gregory, but he had drawn the issue clearly. After the example of his pontificate the moral level of the church rose, and his successors were inspired to carry the investiture struggle to victory at the Concordat of Worms (1122).” During all this time, dealing with countless problems and struggles, Gregory stayed vigilant when monitoring the development of new churches in foreign countries such as Norway, Denmark and Slavic nations, while also constructing the first plans to crusade against the Turks. The Byzantine Emperor who was being threatened by the Turks sent multiple pleas of aid to the west. “While it may have helped to determine the time and the route of the First Crusade, 1095-99, its precise import is difficult to estimate. Modern historians have speculated

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