Globalization of the Fast Food Industry Essay examples

1806 Words Oct 31st, 2011 8 Pages
English 120
11-22-09
Globalization of the Fast Food Industry Imagine a world where almost everyone is overweight, and cultural and family traditions do not exist. Eric Schlosser's book Fast Food Nation: The Dark Side of the All-American Meal explores the effects of the spread of fast-food companies like McDonald's to other countries. In his chapter “Global Realization” Eric Schlosser claims that “The global expansion of American fast food is homogenizing cultural identities; like Las Vegas, it offers “a brief sense of hope… that most brilliant illusion of all, a loss that feels like winning” Schlosser carefully selects and organizes information to advance his claim by using direct evidence as well as more subtle methods. In order
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Schlosser attempts to show that fast food is a health hazard and can change a nation's eating habits by specifically choosing to speak about Japan. He does this because he knows that his readers would most likely know that Japan has a reputation for having a healthy diet and low obesity rates, but once fast food expanded there the statistics changed. Schlosser states “Overweight people were once a rarity in Japan. The nation’s traditional diet of rice, fish, vegetables, and soy products has been deemed one of the healthiest in the world. And yet the Japanese are rapidly abandoning that diet” (538). The obesity epidemic spread from the United States to places like Great Britain, China, and Japan because “the growing popularity of fast food is just one of the many cultural changes that have been brought about by globalization” (Schlosser 538). Japan’s increase of “heart disease, colon cancer, stomach cancer, breast cancer, diabetes, arthritis, high blood pressure, infertility, strokes, and rate of premature death” have also increased since McDonalds made its way to Japan in 1971 (Schlosser 359). Schlosser includes many examples of worldwide fast food resistance in order to show readers how many people have put their foot down against fast food, and subtly persuade readers to take part in the worldwide resistance against fast food. Schlosser shows how different people from different countries rebel against fast food. Many people

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