Compare And Contrast Wacker's Theory

Improved Essays
Compare and contrast the views
Similarities among the views Gelso’s (2006) view of theory is similar, in some respects, to that of Wacker’s (1998). The reason for this conclusion is that there are similarities due to the criteria that determine the testability of the theory, as testability has a close relationship with generalizability. The reason for this conclusion is that testability infers generalizability as well, as if the theory can be tested, it should be generalizable in order to be useful. Research that is not generalizable is usually not worth doing. Also, both Gelso’s (2006) theory view and Wacker’s (1998) view stress logic as being an important criterion for a theory. What this means is that both views stress internal consistency as being important. In addition, they also stress the ability to understand theory on a general level as well.
An additional similarity is between the term retroduction used by Harlow (2009) and abstraction. This is a term used by Wacker (1998) to explain situations in which either data from many sources in the form of multiple case studies or many relationships, in the case of abstraction, are used to strengthen a theory. What this also means is that the research itself will be strengthened, resulting in a higher rate of trustworthiness of the data.
…show more content…
Choosing organizations that have a strategy in place to take advantage of the skills of their employees can provide study participants that are in a positive situation, and create the best opportunity for primary research to succeed (Vandarajan & Jayachandran, 1999). What this means is that, to improve the relationship between theory and research, researchers will want to choose companies to participate in the process that have a value-creating strategy in place. This type of strategy creates a positive atmosphere in which to conduct a study (Vandarjan & Jayachandran,

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    Integrative Theories

    • 1565 Words
    • 6 Pages

    According to (Gelso, 2006), a theory is a statement of some expectation whether factual or assumed that exists between two or more variables. Even though theories vary in levels of abstraction, the goal for researchers should be to make them explicit so that they can be empirically tested for validity. A theory should go beyond the propositional level and further explain why variables relate to one another (Gelso, 2006). Theories serve certain functions and those are descriptive function, delimiting function, generative functions and integrative function (Rychlak, 1968). The descriptive function serves to explain or describe a phenomena, and the fuller the description at giving the causal explanation of phenomena, the higher the explanatory…

    • 1565 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Lastly we can rely on the principles of deduction, because we know for a fact that what is being studied or what is happening is for certain. Whereas induction, is just a possible theory with possible faults; something we cannot rely on. For these main reasons rationalism is a better theory of knowledge and provides a deeper truth than empiricism. Descartes is a profound philosopher who came up with many good thoughts about the branch of philosophy,…

    • 1139 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The first one explains that critical rationalism views learned task as a process leading to growth of objective knowledge. Second characteristic preserves that the activities begins from the recognition of the attempt to solve intellectual problems. The third one distinguishes between the three worlds of knowledges and their conceptual vocabularies. Lastly it is the theoretical analysis of CR is nomalist. The characteristics explains the advantage of CR, there is explanation or reason for everything.…

    • 980 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    However, he sees the struggle these studies have over their quantitative study counterpart. Ungar offers some ideas on how to make your qualitative study more noticeable when your funders lack familiarity with criteria for judging qualitative research. Although you are not changing the methods to a qualitative study you are improving the view of your study to your funders. Ungar says you should “Dress It Up” meaning dress up a qualitative study to make it look quantitative. Adding “Contextualizing activities, which proved to be as insightful to the project, were supported but were seen as supplemental to the real work being done (Ungar, 2006).” The second strategy is discussed as “Sleeping with the Elephant”.…

    • 812 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Logic And Reasoning Essay

    • 912 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Logic and reasoning are important concepts that are parallel. According to the Meriam Webster Dictionary, reasoning is defined as “ the action of thinking about something in a logical, sensible way.”Reasoning as it dictates, provides reason or logic as a manner to produce evidence to corroborate a claim established. However, one could argue that without both attaining knowledge would be difficult to…

    • 912 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Though there is a strong support in combining methodologies of both qualitative and quantitative in research, mixed-methods should be given more attention by researchers (Brannen, 2005). Therefore, this paper discusses the practical and theoretical problems in combining qualitative and quantitative methodologies. Theoretical Considerations The most important issue or problem that arises in the theoretical part of combining both qualitative and quantitative methods is the definition of combined methods or mixed methods itself. Borkan (2004) defines mixed methods research as “those studies or lines of inquiry that integrate one or more qualitative and quantitative techniques for data collection and/or analysis” (p.4). On contrary, Sandelowski…

    • 1225 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Which one is better to use largely depends on the goal of the whole project. Is the writer interested in a systematic approach and wants to produce comparable data, or is he/she trying to produce a thick description on a particular situation, case, or context? The two options require different planning for research, and it should be followed by the specific outline (Creswell, 2008). However, the combination or a mixed method approaches are possible too and from the practise, it seems to be a useful way of solving many problems, which might arise from adopting a single method (Bryman, 2008 pp. 23-24).…

    • 1045 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Examples Of Contextualism

    • 1047 Words
    • 5 Pages

    According to the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, “The typical EC view has it that as the stakes rise or the skeptical doubts become more serious, the contextual standard gets more demanding. It requires S to be in a better position if the attributor claim, ‘S knows that p’, is to express a truth (Epistemic Contextualism, 2007).” In the long run not only does contextualism contribute an understanding to defining something, but it helps with the idea of knowledge, as well to best agree with our everyday knowledge-attributing…

    • 1047 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    ITIL Vs COBIT

    • 901 Words
    • 4 Pages

    ITIL concepts in nature are comprehensive and their extensive use may lead to increase in costs. 2. Implementation of ITIL requires specific training. COBIT: Advantages: 1. It is broader in scope than ITIL in its scope of coverage.…

    • 901 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Superior Essays

    In the process of defining these characteristics, efforts have been made to gain legitimacy. Corley and Gioia (2011) iterate the concept of theory building as providing cohesion and structure, utilitarian, advance our understanding, extend our existing knowledge, offer a new point of view, value added contribution, theoretical insight, improves our understanding, provides an accurate prediction about the observation, is original and challenges current knowledge. Harlow (2009) goes on to describe the process by which testing and developing theory make for a theoretical contribution. This is explained as the process of retroduction, by which researchers retest and reframe their theory against the data as it emerges. To be considered an emergent theory, there…

    • 1003 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays