Right To Consequences For The Legalization Of Abortion

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Which this was a very powerful statement to everyone, as murder is a crime that can be punishable by death. After hearing all of the arguments the Judges determined that the issue was so complex that there would need to be more time to think of the issue, so the further hearings were moved back to October. In October the judges dismissed and said they would have their decision in January. On Monday January 22, 1973 the decision was made (32).

Supreme Court Judge, Justice Blackmun stepped forward to read the decision, ”A state criminal abortion statue of the current Texas type… is violative of… the

14th amendment.”
…show more content…
Some people even tried to fight back against the legalization of abortion, by sending many Human Life amendments sent to congress to attempt illegalizing abortion once again. But none of the of the proposed amendments were passed (34). This affected so many people personally on how they felt about the issue. The bill called Right to Consequence was therefore passed to protect Doctors and Nurses from being forced to perform abortions (34). You would ask why a Doctor or nurse would not like to perform an abortion, most of the times it was against their religious beliefs. Or some people just thought that abortion was a sick thing to do. In 1976, it was also determined that the women does not need permission from their husband (34). Also if the women was under eighteen she did not need the approval for an abortion from her parents (34). Which up until this point in order for minors to have an abortion, parental consent would first be needed. The main reason for minors not being able to make the decision about the abortion, was because they were not believed to have the high enough maturity level for a decision that determined a life. Felicia Lowenstein complicates matters further when she writes, that the government know does not have to pay for abortions (34). These are some of the many outcomes of legalization of …show more content…
Linda Greenhouse and Reva Siegel, writers of Before (and After) Roe v. Wade: New Questions About Backlash believe that many abortions supporters were concerned about backlash from the case (2030). Just the thought of abortion being legalized angered the Catholic Church (2030). This is because the Catholic Church considers abortion murder and murder is a sin in their religion. This was also a perfect time for the Republican political party to use this issue as an opportunity to steal voters from the democratic party, since this was so controversial many people changed their whole political outview (2031). The American Medical Association tried to fight back against abortion by trying to criminalize abortion unless it was to save the pregnant woman 's life, but it failed (2035). People believed that if abortion was criminalized it would result in a problem of rise in poverty (2035). It was believed this would happen because to raise a child it is over thousands of dollars a year, and not everyone has the sufficient amount of funds to pay for a extra child in their house. As crazy as it may seem some women believed that it was equal citizenship to be able to perform an abortion, they felt as if it was a power and privilege of living in the United states that they had (2036). I 've always believed that having an abortion is murder, and to think that someone believe that an abortion is

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