Amazon Talent Management

4205 Words 17 Pages
Talent Management is a set of integrated organisational human resource process designed to attract, develop, motivate and retain productive and engaged employees. The purpose of talent management is to create a high performance and sustainable work environment in the organisation that is able to meet its strategic and operational goals and objectives in a long run. A strategic and holistic approach in talent management is important because it would assist the organisation in finding and attracting the best talent in the market. This can also constitute the attractiveness that the organisation can have that leads to a differentiation and competitive advantage as compared to their competitors. This report will cover the different issues faced …show more content…
Employees that have left Amazon have said that Amazon does not have any concern for work-life balance and would expect employees to be readily available to handle work issues, even on weekends. As a result, their lack of sound policies, capable bosses and proper employee relations reveals that Amazon has an overall poor job environment. Word can spread about Amazon’s poor job environment, which will reach the ears of potential employees. Once they hear that the organisation they were going to apply for actually has a bad reputation for its poor job environment, they will not enter that organisation in the end. Instead, they might choose its direct competitors. Potential employees would not want to enter a company that has bad policies, incompetent supervisors and unpleasant employee relations. Similarly, current employees will not want to stay in that company with a poor job environment and will choose to leave for another. Therefore, having an unfavourable job environment will put the organisation in a competitive disadvantage in the eyes of potential and existing …show more content…
Thus, the company may lose the talent. The general idea behind glass ceiling arguments is that the jobs at the top, which pay more than necessary to attract labour, are in short supply, and are therefore rationed. These glass ceilings, often prevalent in many large companies, are blocking women from becoming senior leaders. As a result, these ceilings are preventing true diversity in the organisations. In December 21, 2009, when Hermina Ibarra and Morten Hansen from Harvard Business Review studied the leadership of the 2,000 of the world’s top performing companies, they found only 29 (1.5%) of those CEOs were women, an even smaller percentage than on the Fortune 500 Global list (2.5%). Only one woman, Meg Whitman, former CEO of eBay, made it to their top 100 CEOs list. Only 9.4% of jobs of Vice-President or higher are occupied by women according to a study completed by Catalyst Corporation. In Singapore, in 2013, there were only 8.3% women amongst directors in the 676 SGX-listed companies, which were studied. There are also evidence that female executives that women have solid work performance, deserving of the

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