Olive Thomas

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    Rhetorical Devices of Elizabeth Stevenson In Babbitts and Bohemians: The American 1920s, Elizabeth Stevenson describes a change in the American people’s way of life during the 1920s. This change occurred in the way people, especially women, started to live a more free and distinctive lifestyle. Throughout this excerpt from Stevenson’s piece, she developed her argument using helpful rhetorical devices that displayed the 1920s as an exciting, new, and noteable change of life in America. Diction was used to add emphasis to descriptions of lifestyle, women, and the flapper and the way they changed in the 1920s. Symbolism was used to characterize the new attitude of women in a specific, and familiar form. Additionally, the use of logos logically supported Stevenson point that the 1920s was a groundbreaking time period in which Americans had changed as people and started to live a looser way of life. Through diction, symbolism, and the use of logos, Elizabeth Stevenson persuades her audiences that the new age of the 1920s had brought about a new lifestyle for the American people. Stevenson uses heavy diction to describe the new attitude of women and the symbol of the flapper. The words that she chose created great imagery for the audience that allowed them to be able to really picture her words and time period that she was describing. “-But she is unafraid and a little bold-” (Stevenson 4) is one example in which Stevenson creates this diction through the use of the words…

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    1920s Fashion Essay

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    Freedoms such as being able to vote, express them-selves, and gain a sense of respect from others. Not only was fashion a piece of material back in the 1920’s, but also a form of movement. With the turn of the decade and fashion, women were able to speak for them-selves whether their voices were seen or heard as negative or positive. The Flapper image became negative for the elders but the image allowed young women to be able to grow out of that stage into mature women. Wanting to move out due…

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    Known for its fast paced lifestyle, experimentation, and break in traditions, the ‘Roaring Twenties’ produced ideals and technology that changed America forever. One of the many prominent features of the early 20th century was the emergence of the “flapper,” women who deviated from the traditional Victorian female standards at the time. These women often bobbed their hair, wore short dresses and skirts, and took on many characteristics that had only been deemed appropriate for men. The…

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    Flappers Research Paper

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    Page used the factor of appearance to define the term "flapper". To her, a "flapper" is a woman who is within the age limit (not quite a woman but also not a girl)that would have bobbed hair (the 'badge' of flapper hood) and stylish clothing that no decent women of earlier generations would have even thought about wearing. There were many different explanations of the flapper phenomenon. Some say that it's due to the fact that one-quarter to one-third of urban woman workers live alone, free…

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    Flappers In The 1920's

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    Flappers embodied the changing attitudes of women after World War I. Once men left their jobs for the war, women had to fill their empty roles. Women became workers that contributed to society rather than just mothers and wives. Men returned from war expecting to go back to a male-dominated society, however they were greeted by women that had tasted freedom and wanted their own independence. These new women began to call themselves “flappers”. They rebelled against all previous conventional…

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    The flapper in the 1920’s was a new type of girl never seen before.She was typically a young girl who was of a middle class. The flapper wore heavy makeup, shorter and more extravagant dresses and had more fun. Flappers often times did thing that was frowned upon by society. Flapper culture was inspiring for young girls and yet it was frightening for people who wanted to preserve the image of “The Gibson girl.” The Gibson girl was a woman who had longer hair and dresses that concealed most of…

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    Flappers Persuasive Speech

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    Oldies may say these girls are over the top, brainless, useless, irresponsible, disrespectful, or flamboyant, but these girls believe that they are the new generation… the next big thing… the “New Woman.” We’ve noticed that Flappers are actually starting to seem threatening towards those against them. Who knows, it could just be because of the new look, flappers representing a new moral order, or even the older generation still might value their olden ways. I know that if I were one of the…

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    Flapper is an interesting read about the Jazz Age and the women who rejected the original roles that their mothers and grandmothers did. These young girls took on a more masculine lifestyle; the girls smoked frequently, drank, and wore short hair. But their behavior did not relinquish their feminine ways, it provided an adaptation to society to what a woman should be and what a woman should not be. The flapper modeled herself in opposite to the 'Victorian Ideal', which was apparent in her…

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    Paul's Letter

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    of the olive tree’s branches, Romans 11:17-24 describes the inclusion of the Gentiles, stresses the equality between Gentiles and Jews within the movement, and exemplifies the power of God. This passage builds on themes prevalent throughout Paul’s letters such as equality, unity, and the salvation through God and the belief in Jesus. Paul does this through an olive tree, describing God’s ability to break off branches representing the unbelievers, while also grafting on those who have faith in…

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    Many people have some things in common and something different about them from other people. Tomi and Keet has some things the same and different about them. Tomi does not fight, does good things, and he lives on somebody else's property. Keet always wants to fight, he does not do the right things, and his family owns their own land to live on. But there are some things that are similar about theses two. A trait that Tomi has is that that Keet does not is that he does not fight. This is…

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