Black nationalism

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    Black Nationalism

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    is Black Nationalism (Defining Black Nationalism, 1). In addition to Black Nationalism, Pan-Africanism has had a tremendous role in the effort to bring the African diaspora and African community together. Through the advocacy of Pan-Africanism, the belief that unity is vital to economic, social, and political progress and aims to "unify and uplift"…

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    The philosophy of Black Nationalism as espoused by Malcolm X differs greatly to the viewpoints of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr’s. Between Dr. Martin Luther King Jr’s philosophy—nonviolence and civil disobedience—and Malcolm X—any means that is necessary—I would most identify myself with the philosophy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr’s due to the aspect of nonviolence and civil disobedience that is peaceful in arguing a movement for equality. Additionally, some would choose the means like Malcolm X in…

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    from blacks is what Black Nationalism is about. Black Nationalism is the desire, or want, for a separate nation just for black people. Black Nationalism started due to whites being discriminatory towards the African American race. Many African Americans wanted a self-determined life. A life with no hate, a life without feeling targeted at every extent of their life. Living in a society full of White Supremacy is not ideal for people of color. During the mid 1800’s, Black Nationalism was…

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    Early American black society chose to show their independence and authority in a predominately white society by embracing the philosophies of Black Nationalism and Black Separatism. Since the first Africans were forced to come to the United States as slaves, they struggled to develop their own identity and find respect in a culture which originally regarded them as beasts of burden. World War I essentially triggered the Great Migration where blacks moved from the south to the north to find new…

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    asking of these questions Black Nationalism took a stand in preaching self-reliance, a holistic approach in viewing nationalism in the black community and created a sense of intellectual liberation, the effects of this can be seen vividly in the art and literature of the Black Arts Movement. In the climax of Amiri Baraka’s Dutchman Clay does just this, eviscerating all of Lula’s preconceived notions of what blackness was and gave her an inside understanding of what her privilege disallows her to…

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    Malcolm X rose to prominence as an African-American orator in the 1960s. His ideas were diverse in separating the blacks, allowing violence upon violence, against other activists wishes, as well as becoming part of the Nation of Islam. These notions grew in success over time, some failing, yet still, caused the power of Black Nationalism. The ability to distinguish oneself and advocate on black independence, earn national identity and be equally free as the whites. Most importantly proud like…

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    Black Nationalism is a political and social movement that originated in the 1850's. Black Nationalism was made most popular by Marcus Garvey in the 1920's among African Americans in the United States. Black Nationalism is defined as, "The belief that black people share a common destiny, and have had a common experience: slavery, oppression, colonialism, and exploitation." Racial unity is the most basic form of Black Nationalism. It is simply a feeling that black people, because of their…

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    As a result, the Black Nationalist ideology emerged as a response to the economic exploitation and political abandonment endured by the people of African descent throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Though Black Nationalism developed in the United States it is not a unique phenomenon. In every part of the world, the belief that a people who share a common history, culture, and heritage should determine their own fate has pushed for a united racial consciousness as a way to…

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    Another issue that Malcolm X discusses is the “civil rights” movement. With the history of the treatment of African Americans in the United States, in addition to his philosophy of Black Nationalism, Malcolm X has made a name for himself as a critic of civil rights. Malcolm X’s main point in “The Ballot or the Bullet” is the concept of Black Nationalism. This idea comes from the fact that all African Americans have suffered, “political oppression at the hands of the white man, economic…

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    To demonstrate, “Malcolm X delivered "The Ballot or the Bullet" to a predominantly African-American meeting in… the Congress of Racial Equality …which was shifting from nonviolent protest to Malcolm X-like black nationalism. Helping provoke this shift were speeches like this one, which was received enthusiastically” (Miller). Many African Americans came to Malcolm’s speech because they really wanted to know what he meant by the “ballot” and “bullet”. By the end of his speech, Malcolm wanted that…

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