Fine Motor Control Study

Better Essays
Ploog, Scharf, Nelson, and Brooks (2013) conducted a case-control study using computerized visual representations of emotional facial expressions to simulate real life situations. The use of a 3D avatar was used in three stages to study and improve emotion recognition in children with autism spectrum disorder. Stage one, participants were asked to interpret what emotion the avatar was feeling. Stage two participants were given different scenarios and were asked to guess what emotion the avatar would feel based on that specific scenario. In stage three, the children were a certain emotion that the avatar was feeling and was asked what scenario or event they thought caused this emotion. This virtual environment indicated that children were able to communicate more effectively with other people and that 90% of the participants were able to interpret, recognize and predict emotions from the avatar (Ploog et al., 2013). Wainer, and Ingersoll (2011) conducted a randomized control study with ten participants’ ages 16 to 40 using computer treatment. Participants were randomly assigned to a computer treatment …show more content…
This is a cohort study that is based off of thirtyfour participants age ranging from twelve to thirty-six months. In this study a measure of fine motor skills were used to tap motor planning and fine motor control for the children ranging in age from 12-18 months they also used a measure of vocabulary for the children at 36 months. Along with using both of those during this study they used standardized observational measures of fine motor and language skills as a “complementary source of information”. (LeBarton, E., 2013). The results for this study showed that the “composite scores were significantly lower for the HR group (M = 3.62, SD = 1.86) than the LR group (M = 5.20, SD = 1.41) (U = 215.0, p = .001)” (LeBarton, E.,

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    Sixty-five percent of these students were considered to have a disability. The self-contained rooms offered a much smaller class size of six students, all with disabilities. (Rafferty et. al 2003). To measure student development, researchers used a series of standardized tests.…

    • 2229 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Auditory Memory

    • 1920 Words
    • 8 Pages

    Nelson set forth in 1980 to discover exactly why infantile amnesia occurs. They look at different age groups in children and try to find a pattern, hypothesizing that older children will have a much easier time remembering than younger children, even when the age difference is as small as a couple of months due to the fact that verbal encoding of memories is much more difficult for younger children with less verbal abilities. The study consisted of nineteen toddles (10 female and nine male) ranging from twenty-one months old to twenty-four months old. Mothers of the children kept records with specific instructions and questions to answer for the child’s memory. They recorded an average of six memories over a three month period.…

    • 1920 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The article is about a research study where children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) were taught how to play board and card games such as Uno, Go Fish, and Yahtzee Junior. Researches would play part of a game with a child and record how they followed the steps and their behavior. This piece comes to the conclusion that children with ASD will benefit from learning how to play these games by giving them more opportunities to interact with their peers and improve social skills. I had to open up my searches a little bit to find this piece because it was more scientific than my other sources. I choose this one to add a different approach to board games in contrast to my other articles.…

    • 819 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Children think differently than adults, and therefore develop their thoughts differently. According to the psychology book, cognitive development can be described as the study of how children acquire the ability to learn, think, reason, communicate, and remember. One can observe a great difference between a 3-year-old preschooler’s thinking pattern and a 9-year-old student’s thinking pattern. Each child has a different thinking ability which falls into a stage of Piaget’s theory of stages of development. According to Piaget’s theory of stages of development, the 3-year-old would be in the preoperational stage.…

    • 455 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Clarity Case Study Essay

    • 793 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Main, O’Rourke, Morris, and Dunjey (2016) completed a case study of 10 students with disabilities aged from 6-10. The case study used the Nintendo DS to explore how this type of mainstream technology could support the learning of and how it influenced levels of engagement of students with disabilities. The data were collected by interviews and standardized assessments. Main et al. (2016) indicated that students were positively engaged with the Nintendo DS.…

    • 793 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    All these children had hearing loss measured at more than 80 dB and nonverbal intelligence. They were given sign and reading vocabulary tasks and story comprehension in both languages. By doing so they examined how other factors, such as having hearing parents or a language preference, affected their performance on these tasks. Their reading skills were measured with two tests where they had to read vocabulary and write a story. Vocabulary was assessed by having the child look at a written word on a screen and match it with the correct picture.…

    • 1531 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Effects Of Lead Poisoning

    • 2125 Words
    • 9 Pages

    (2007) focused their study on children in North Carolina “to determine whether blood lead levels in early childhood are related to educational achievement in early elementary school as measured by performance on end-of-grade (EOG) testing” (p. 1242). The authors were looking at scores for mathematics and reading by getting information from the NCERDC (North Carolina Education Research Data Center) from 1995-1996. Early childhood lead exposures appear to have a bigger impact on reading than on mathematics portions of the EOG, although the differences may not be statistically significant, according to Miranda et al., 2007, p.1246. Miranda et al. (2007), states there is a discernible impact of end-of-grade test with children’s blood level tests (BLL) as low as 2ug/dL.…

    • 2125 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    In addition, observation of other children was conducted to determine the median of social interactions. Before the intervention, three trained observers were recording data for targeted skills for 10 minutes at least three times a week. The treatment included reading aloud the individualized Social Story during free play at least once a day and then checking basic comprehension of the text by asking students questions after the story was read. The results of the study revealed that the Social Story intervention decreased problem behaviors immediately but modestly for all students and there was none significant decrease in problem prosocial functioning for all participants. According to the authors only 1 child “was the closest to approaching the social behavior rate of age and gender-matched typically developing peers” (p. 8).…

    • 543 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    SES Child Development

    • 2122 Words
    • 9 Pages

    This study reduces the age to seven months old and focuses on female infants. The authors of this study recorded evaluating other researcher’s studies, including one that showed children, at the age of twenty-two months, who belonged to families with private insurance, who scored around one deviation higher than children from Medicaid-type insurance of the Language Composite score of the Bayley Scales of Infant Development (Wild, Betancourt, Brodsky, & Hurt, 2013). Another study the authors’ reviewed provided evidence that high SES was associated with higher quality of maternal speech in the home (Hoff, 2002). Lastly, the researchers looked at another study - one which greatly influenced their hypotheses for their own experiment.…

    • 2122 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    1. Children with sensory processing and autism spectrum disorder were the key words used to search the UNF OneSource database. This research compared the home and the school sensory processing challenges. I continue to be curious about how students act while in the two settings and compare the students’ behavior to each other. 2.…

    • 1274 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays