Tuna Fish Case Study

Improved Essays
Problem Statement: How can U.S. Fisheries prevent or decrease the harm to the ecological environment from overfishing of tuna fish?

Background: The United States is overfishing the Atlantic coast with a variety of new-age fishing methods, which has destroyed and will continue to further damage our ocean’s ecological systems. Since the 21st century began, industrial fishing off the Unites States’ coasts have drastically changed in their methods to provide citizens of this country with a bountiful amount of in-demand seafood. Such seafood include fish like the Blue Fin Tuna, Marlins, and Swordfish; all endangered or at-risk species. Many of the people believe that the ocean is full of fish and it is so vast – can we even run out of fish? Unfortunately,
…show more content…
This is prompted by the belief that its value might be worth more than gold as we continue to hunt it out of existence.
An online web organization, Overfishing.org, reports that over 25% of fish stocks are either overexploited or depleted, with only 1% recovering from depletion with the help of fish farming (another method which equally does both harm and good). From these dwindling levels of catch come another predicament – entire ecosystems are disappearing along with the fish populations.
Destructive fishing techniques like bottom trawling, dynamiting, and poisoning destroy habitats near shore as well as in the deep sea. This loss of aquatic habitats removes crucial organisms’ homes that may have provided that area with a means of stability and reproduction, as well as acted as prey for larger animals. Because the larger fish are becoming scarce, the smaller fish are becoming too abundant with not much to control its population. Diversity within the ocean is at
…show more content…
The Marine Conservation Institute has observed that bottom trawling is more wasteful then beneficial due to the machines dragging 905 by catch, which later gets tossed back overboard. Economically, this decision is sound in banning the practice.
Policy Option 3: Regulate fishing seasons by catch per pound.
The most sustainable option that considers both parties of consumer and environment is this. There does not have to be a ban on fishing to stop the overfishing crises – but instead implement a set limit on catch. Each fishing organization that brings in wholesale catch will be limited by how much they distribute their fish and to whom; that will pertain how many pounds they can catch per day, week, or month. Each state can set their limit however they like based on adequate research to validate the statistics that would choose.
Policy Option 4: Active support organizations to educate and reform backed by

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    As fishermen are doing their jobs, the shark population is dropping catastrophically. The environmental engineer and writer of Scientific and Educational Publications talked about the shark numbers in the ocean and that the “populations of dusky, oceanic whitetip, and silky sharks in the Gulf of Mexico have declined by 79% to 97% since the 1950s due to overfishing. Massive declines are also reported over the same time period for blue, mako, oceanic whitetip, silky, and thresher sharks in the tropical Pacific Ocean” (“Threats to Aquatic Environments”). As the fishermen continue their job the percentages a dropping more. The lowering percentage is not only directed to one shark species.…

    • 2517 Words
    • 11 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Gill Netting Effect

    • 981 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Ghost nets are nets, in this case gillnets, that fisherman leave behind, lose, or forget about. Ghost nets are usually hard to see and are caught very easily on many surfaces. Unattended gill nets are getting away from the owners and lost in the oceans and other bodies of water. The lost gill nets are causing many problems. All sorts of marine and aquatic animals are getting trapped in ghost nets.…

    • 981 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    This is done so the fins can be sold on the black market, fins are sold for about $650 per kilogram (about 2.2 lbs) so they are in high demand ("Shark Truth." Shark Fin Trade –.). The number of Shark fisheries has exploded, and there are signs that some Shark populations have declined dramatically. According to one estimate, by researchers at Dalhousie University in Nova Scotia, 100 million Sharks are now killed annually, on average, (Baum, Julia K., Ransom A. Myers, Daniel G. Kehler, Boris Worm, Shelton J. Harley, and Penny A. Doherty. Collapse and Conservation of Shark Populations in the Northwest Atlantic. )…

    • 1727 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Sharks: Finning and Management As the human population continues to increase, the demand for food also increases. An estimated 15 percent of consumed animal protein come from marine fish, and an overall 90 percent of the predatory fish, at the top of the food chain, are declining (Human, n.d). Hammerhead sharks, particularly scalloped hammerheads are the most threatened because of their fins and meat. The methods used for capturing this rare species are wasteful and cruel, and their decline is presenting tragic consequences for the ecosystem of the ocean (Shiffman, July 2014). Finning, Overfishing, and Bycatch Sharks are “apex” predators at the top of the ocean’s food chain.…

    • 837 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Farmed Fish Pros And Cons

    • 767 Words
    • 4 Pages

    The practice of raising farmed fish in extremely confined enviroments, and killing them in painful ways like evisceration, starvation, or asphyxiation, must be regarded as inhumane. The close quarters where farmed fish are raised means disease can spread fast, while contaminants and deadly pathogens can spread beyond the nets and get into the free fish swimming past. Sea lice, a type of crustacean that is easily incubated by captive fish on farms, have become a major problem and have been the reason for declining numbers of wild pink salmon, as well as the animals that depend on them for food, such as bears, and eagles. Concentrated antibiotics, pesticides and other harmful chemicals are often used to fight disease mostly found on farmed fish. The effect this has on the environment is only beginning to be uinderstood, but dosnt look good.…

    • 767 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Causes Of Overfishing

    • 582 Words
    • 3 Pages

    This is bad for marine life because commercial fishing is one of the main causes of overfishing. Overfishing is when too many of a species is killed at one time. This leads to the endangerment or possibly the extinction of the species because there are not enough left to repopulate. Another cause of this problem is bycatch (also is caused by commercial fishing). This when fisherman catches fish or sea…

    • 582 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    This allows fishermen to catch the cod fish without any limits or barriers and in general, gives them the incentive to maximise their self –interests. This contributed to the collapse of the fishery, fore it was difficult to stop or slow down the rate of fishing in the waters. The collapse of the fishery may be seen as a sufficient condition. This meant that with the presence of overfishing, the occurrence of the collapse of the fishery is guaranteed. Fish is generally seen as a renewable resource because the fish can reproduce to regenerate the fish population.…

    • 1713 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Declined in shark population breaks stability of The marine ecosystem The shark, the predator that stands on top of the food chain. However, its number has declined since the 1970s due to human destruction, and it will affect the stability of the food chain (Dudley, and Cliff 243-255). For instance, in Aldo Leopold’s paper, A Sand County Almanac, he claims each specie’s importance in the food chain is the link to the other specie “The lines of dependency for food and other services are called food chains….Each species, including ourselves, is a link in many chains” (286). Along with shark’s substantial power as top predator in the ocean, it can help to keep each marine specie to balance in numbers (Fairclough 1); it behooves every humankind…

    • 1486 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Essay On Shark Finning

    • 1005 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Already eighteen species of shark have been listed as endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (“Shark Finning”). All because humans are greedy and can only think about themselves and not about the environment. Today, sharks are declining rapidly on a global scale because humans have replaced them as oceans top predator (Fairclough). Restating that, humans, whose natural environment is on land, have replaced sharks, whose natural environment is in the sea, as the top predator of the ocean. It is astonishing how humans believe they can take over the world and that all other living organisms are below them.…

    • 1005 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    (Heithaus) There is already signs of this happening all around the world. If the humans do not stop hunting the sharks, one of the main sources of the world’s photosynthesis could become endangered. The world may never know precisely how many sharks are in the ocean, or exactly how many are killed each year by fishermen. What is known, from many of different types of experiments, is that the population of many different types of sharks are decreasing at very alarming rates. Perhaps more importantly, the people of the world know that what they are doing to the sharks is wrong and that they should stop the killing so that the sharks can repopulate to help the ecosystem.…

    • 613 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays