6 Pros And Cons Of Overfishing

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Fishing. People enjoy it a lot as a hobby or career whether it’s for a bonding experience between family or friends or a way to survive. But could it be too much? We have of plenty of fish, right? Wrong. Small fishing in ponds, lakes, and sea sides by one or two people won’t make much of a difference, but with the main fishing companies hauling thousands to millions of marine life out of the oceans daily, it will be. This is overfishing; depleting stocks of fish in a body of water by too much fishing. This is the problem that will be explained by this paper, as well as the background of it and possible solutions to solve the problem. Now the history of overfishing will be explained. According to Greenpeace International, “since the …show more content…
There are some upsides to overfishing/ the pros of overfishing. In “6 Pros and Cons of Overfishing” by ‘Flow Psychology’ they have these pros that I will mention. It has created more job opportunities because “Since the aquaculture industry boom, numerous jobs have been made available to the people.” Provides new skills sets and “…training will be needed. As a result, people will have new sets of skills that can be added to their resume.” Help boost the economy with the “Exportation of seafood products will also do good for any country as it provides more work and more income for the government.” Helps people eat healthier because “Seafood is healthier than other kinds of meat. With more people becoming more health conscious nowadays, it’s no wonder there is a growing demand for seafood.” It meets the growing demand for food because “Overfishing helps feed the masses.” Helps replenish the marine life, when some “Companies that are into overfishing have replenishment systems to ensure that they can continue to meet …show more content…
In an article called “Sunken Millions: The Hidden Cost of Overfishing to Commercial Fishermen by Federal Ocean Policy,” they found how much they have been losing. “In 2009, commercial fishermen in the New England, South Atlantic, and Gulf of Mexico regions that targeted depleted ocean fish population lost $164.2 million and realized just 2 percent of potential revenues because decades of overfishing.” They go on and explain how “this additional income could have been earned had these fish populations not been subject to years of overfishing that results in their current depleted condition.” Conservation and Management Act (MSA) with bipartisan requirements want to create science- based catch limits to end overfishing and replenish deplete fish populations. The economic debate about fisheries management has mostly focused on the cost of regulation, but this report shows that the cost of allowing overfishing to continue can be quite great or even greater. Congress should reject bills that don’t focus on ongoing efforts to end and prevent overfishing through the use of science-based annual catch limits. Instead, they say, Congress should support and help support the conservation requirements of MSA that will supply enduring economic benefits to fishermen. They’re not the only ones who know the cost of this. “Old salt’s in England’s commercial cod fishery also know the cost of

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