Tuberculosis And Malaria

Improved Essays
Programs for HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria
This paper discusses how there is an important overlap between HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria, known as ‘the big three’ and neglected tropical diseases. It suggests that in order to combat the big three, we must first target the multitude of tropical diseases. It highlights the geographic and epidemiologic overlap of the big three most predominantly in sub-Saharan Africa. The paper discusses the different relationships between the diseases and infections and what occurs as a result of the overlap. It is explained how additional infections can severely worsen the effects of HIV and increase the chance of mother- to –child transmission. The authors emphasize that public health interventions
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Several patients were studied in a hospital in Zambia. The outcome of the study confirmed 49% of the tuberculosis infected individuals were simultaneously HIV positive. The paper discusses the issue of misdiagnosis of tuberculosis and subsequent lack of treatment. The onset of the symptoms of AIDs may cause the identification of tuberculosis to be more difficult. It emphasizes the importance of early detection of both diseases as it is proven that HIV infection does not impair the effects of tuberculosis treatment. This study will provide information for the latter sections of my assignment where I will discuss detection and treatment of HIV/AIDS and …show more content…
This allowed the researchers to quantify the effects that HIV had on their lives. Mining requires very physically demanding work and individuals who were HIV positive were forced to progressively miss work. The paper discusses how HIV can affect mortality, chance of tuberculosis and work-related injuries. This paper will fit in with my assignment when I discuss the implications of HIV infection on quality of life and health outcomes.

Tuberculosis mortality nearly halved since 1990
This recent news release from the WHO suggests that tuberculosis control programs have proven to be very successful over the past two decades. The article expresses views from the WHO Director General, WHO’s Global TB program, and WHO Assistant Director General for HIV. It is explained that while the health programs have had great success, there is still a lot more research and intervention effort necessary to diminish TB and HIV prevalence in the world. This article will fit into my paper by offering recent information and observations on the outcome of current health intervention

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