Compare And Contrast Andrew Jackson Assimilate American Indians

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Thomas Jefferson made a policy in the 1780s to assimilate American Indians into white society. Andrew Jackson, however, passed a policy of removing Cherokees from their lands to the west of the Mississippi in the 1830s. The common goal of the two policies was to acquire Indian lands because the white colonists wanted to expand westward. Battles went on between the Americans and the American Indians, as one tried to take as the other tried to protect the lands. The policies the presidents passed was to take the lands of the Indians, but they had different ways of doing so.
Thomas Jefferson saw the American Indians as being similar to the Europeans in mind and body since they worked hard to protect their lands and saw themselves as free people. He believed that the American Indians were good human material but the only issue he had was their culture. Most Americans, including Jefferson, saw American Indian culture as savagery but believed they could be civilized through education, Christian religion, and commercial agriculture. The Indians felt pressured for the land so some tribes decided to accept the policy to assimilate into civilization as a means of survival to avoid wars with the white Americans.
Fights did happen though, even when the Indians assimilated into American civilization. When Jackson was elected, his main goal was to remove
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They believed that they are the superior race while all other races, such as the Mexicans, Indians, Blacks, Filipinos, were inferior to them due to the difference in “linguistic, psychological, moral, and biological characteristics.” There were scientific claims that supported their actions of slavery and conquering other lands, as well as support that the white race was superior. Science has shifted the attention and responsibility away from the oppressor and toward the targets of

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