Andrew Jackson Rhetorical Analysis

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During his presidency, Andrew Jackson no doubt planned the removal of Indians for the benefit of the US. However, when he misled the Indians into thinking he did it for their sakes, he went against his own promises of peaceful relations and respect for the Native Americans. Jackson refused to enforce the Supreme Court’s decision in the Worcester vs Georgia case where the Cherokees’ sovereignty was established, and continued to badger them into moving without acknowledging their rights. In dealing with the Indians, Jackson neglected the Treaty of Tellico, a treaty established in 1805 that set clear boundaries between the US and Cherokees, and pushed them out of their own lands. Therefore, because of his unlawful actions in dealing with the Native …show more content…
He gave the Indian tribes a message of peace as if he didn’t want to do anything against them, showing the peace between him and the Indian Tribes. Also in his Second Annual Message to Congress he stated "Toward the aborigines of the country no one can indulge a more friendly feeling than myself, or would go further in attempting to reclaim them from their wandering habits and make them a happy, prosperous people." By doing so, he conveyed that he had no intentions of harming the tribes and wanted to show his good intentions to them. By this time, the Indian Removal Act was slowly coming to a decision of being accepted or not, and even though he had been planning the removal, Jackson reassured the Indian tribes that it was to help rather than harm them, though in reality he was actually harming. For many years, the Indian tribes had lived on the American lands with their belief that the land didn’t belong to a single person but to everyone. The land where the tribes lived on was where …show more content…
However, negotiate is a term to be used lightly. Andrew Jackson continued to pressure the Cherokees and other Native Americans to leave the Southeast despite the fact that the Cherokees had their sovereign status confirmed by the Supreme Court in Worcester vs. Georgia when John Marshall said, “The Cherokee Nation, then, is a distinct community, occupying its own territory, with boundaries accurately described”. President Jackson violated court orders when he continued to pressure the Native Americans into giving up their lands because it didn’t give Jackson the power to deal with the Cherokees on his own - it was to the US as a whole. Wanting to justify his actions, Jackson had a few Cherokees, the Treaty Party, sign the Treaty of New Echota, a treaty that said the Cherokees were to give up their lands in exchange for land elsewhere, money, and retribution from the national government, even though a good majority were against it. This treaty pushed for a massive Indian migration that’d later be called the Trail of

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