The Pros And Cons Of The Pill

1454 Words 6 Pages
As humans in society, having a child has always been a dominant issue in women 's’ lives. A child is a commitment and if unwanted can be a curse upon a woman for the rest of her life. The amount of effort from going to school and work can be stressful enough, adding a baby on top of that could impact a woman’s life in a way that may consume her will to work or go to school. Birth control, at least the pill, has not been readily available for single women up until the recent decades. Birth control can reduce the chance of a woman conceiving a child, some methods more effective and intrusive than others. While other forms have been passed just by word of mouth and proven to be just a myth. There have been many forms of contraceptives invented …show more content…
Many were a hassle to use, like douching or suppositories, while the condom is needed every time a person has sex and can be a hassle and less satisfying to use. The pill had an immense impact on women and their relationship with contraceptives because it can be taken discretely at any chosen time and place. The pill was the first method that gave women control and the privacy to enact it. However, even after the invention in the 1960s, the pill was not given freely to any woman. After the invention of the pill, in 1965, The Supreme Court legalized the use of birth control for married couples. Only until 1972, birth control was legalized for all citizens of the United States. Access to hormonal birth control has contributed to women being more empowered in the economy as well as in their education. Ever since the invention of birth control in the 1960, the wage gap between men and women, still significant, has been narrowed.. The decrease in the gap among 25–49-year-olds between men’s and women’s annual incomes “would have been 10 percent smaller in the 1980s and 30 percent smaller in the 1990s” in the absence of widespread legal birth control access. (Sonfield, 2016). College enrollment was 20 percent higher among women who could access the birth control pill legally by age 18 in 1970, compared with women who could not (Sonfield, 2016). Access to birth control has led to more women …show more content…
The pill was not convenient enough. From an implant in your arm to a copper insertion into your uterus. Now there are contraceptive methods that you only need to take or replace once a week, month, year, or even twelve years. This includes, the Emergency Contraceptive, or Plan B, that you can take up to three days after having unprotected intercourse. Each of these contraceptive methods contain either or both synthetic versions of the female hormones, progesterone and estrogen. Both progesterone and estrogen are produced in the ovaries, and levels tend to fall and rise during a woman’s cycle. Every month, after the rise and fall of a woman’s natural hormone levels, an egg is released from the ovaries and awaits fertilization - this window of time is usually called a woman’s ovulation period. If the egg does not become fertilized, it is released - and this is the woman’s period. Synthetic hormones are used to stabilize the levels of natural hormones, preventing estrogen from peaking in the middle of a woman’s cycle as it normally does which causes the release of an egg from the ovaries. Synthetic estrogen works to stop the pituitary gland (the master gland of hormones) from producing estrogen which in turn, prevents ovulation. Synthetic progesterone, also known as progestin, stops the pituitary gland from producing it’s own progesterone which prevents the release of an

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