The Importance Of Teacher-Student Communication

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As children we are raised to always have respect for authority figures, no matter what positon they’re in. An example of this would be the way students respect their teachers in the classroom because of the teachers’ expert power (McCroskey, Richmond 1983). In this case expert power is the student’s perception that the teacher is competent and knowledgeable in all areas of study (McCroskey, Richmond 1983). But when you think about it, how much of this urge to respect our teachers comes from what we have been told to do our whole lives or the subconscious effect of nonverbal communication? After everything we have learned this semester, it’s easier to begin to think critically about the ways in which people use nonverbal communication on a daily …show more content…
So from the very moment we walk into our first classroom in preschool or kindergarten, there is automatic knowledge that the teacher ultimately rules over everyone. In an article written by McCroskey and Richmond (1983) “the type of power exerted will have a major impact on the quality of teacher-student communication.” Whether teachers realize it or not, they are always communicating. Teachers are relaying information based on their facial expressions, clothing, gestures, environment and even age at any given time. However, by understanding this teachers can use nonverbal communication to enhance the learning environment in their classrooms, as well as, connect more deeply with their …show more content…
A teacher who arranges the desk in a way that promotes collaboration and discussion rather than individual work can lead to a better learning environment. For example, lining the desks in rows can be distracting to some students because of all the heads they have to look over or around to see the front of the room. The “U” shape arrangement of desks is popular because it allows each student to be accountable and present during every class discussion (specialsections.suntimes.com). It makes it harder for students to hide behind others of slump down in their chairs to avoid the conversation. Arranging these semi-fixed elements (Shahnazi Lecture, 2014) as a way for students to participate, demonstrates the teacher’s use of power. He/she is nonverbally communicating how they expect their students to interact just by the arrangement of desks. When teachers control their classroom environment in this way they are guiding the social behavior (Shahnazi Lecture, 2014) of their students. The expectation that the students will engage in classroom discussion and actively listen can be presented right as the students walk through the door. This gives the teacher complete control over how the classroom layout directly affects

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