Piaget's Theory Of Pedagogy

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In this essay we will discuss effective primary teaching and how this is utilized to deliver the national curriculum. Furthermore, we will focus on how effective teaching relates to a school achieving an outstanding grade from the governing body, Ofsted. We will also explore the different policies within the education system and how these policies outline how the curriculum is taught. This essay will also analyse what is meant by effective pedagogy.
The word pedagogy has its origin in Greek language and its historical definition translates to, ‘the art of teaching’. The definition of pedagogy has become more complex and distinct over time, Stephanie Stoll Dalton (2007 p.4) defines pedagogy as, “the system of principles and methods that supports
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There are three key theorists, Piaget, Vygotsky and Bruner. These theorist’s views and ideologies majorly influenced pedagogy. They all have radically different philosophies surrounding how to teach and the best way for the student to learn. These theorists have differing views as a single way of teaching is not firmly established as being the best, as every pupil learns differently and how one pupil may learn effectively another may not.
Jean Piaget, born 1896, was a phycologist and theorist who strategized the theory of cognitive development. Piaget was a key figure in the influence of the formation of pedagogy as Kyriacou, (1997 p.29) states, “The work of Piaget, in studying development of children has had a great impact on discussion of teaching and learning in schools.” In his theory he believed that active learning and learning by discovery were the best methods for teaching. He
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Vygotsky theorised that children should learn through their surroundings, in the form of social interactions with classmates. He believed that interaction with other students is an effective way of developing skills and strategies within the classroom. Vygotsky theorised that if a less competent student is put into a group with high functioning students the child will benefit from the input of the skilled students and therefore improve their learning. He called this the zone of proximal development. Vygotsky (Vygotsky, 1978, p. 86), defines zone of proximal development as, “the distance between the actual developmental level as determined by independent problem solving and the level of potential development as determined through problem solving under adult guidance, or in collaboration with more capable peers.” Vygotsky theorised that the role of the adult is to nurture, support and extend the learning of the pupil through physical interaction and quality conversation. Within Vygotsky’s theory there are 3 principles. The first, is that children construct their own knowledge. He believed that children working together in a group setting grow and expand their knowledge themselves. The second principle is that development cannot be separated from its social context. This is theorising that the child cannot be separated from the social aspect of learning as this will hinder teaching and

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